4 Hot Tips for Refinancing Your Parent PLUS Loans

Well they did it — they made it to college. While your children may be busy with college classes or working at the job that college education afforded them, you may be making payments on federal PLUS Loans for parents for many more years to come.

Parent PLUS loans are pretty easy to get and many schools “packaged” these loans for parents into students’ financial aid award letters. Those conveniences come with a hidden price, though. Repayment options that may be great for some but not beneficial to others and interest rates that are often higher than financially savvy consumers deserve and that vary each academic year.

Today, education loan refinance rates are often much lower than what you may be paying for your PLUS loans.

When Should You Refinance Your Parent PLUS Loans?

Although refinancing federal parent PLUS loans may not be the right choice for everyone, here are four examples of when doing so might be the right thing for you.

1. When you want a single lower rate

Parent PLUS loans are fixed-rate loans, so the rate for the school year your child used the funds is the rate that specific loan will always be. For example, PLUS loans taken out for the 2018–2019 school year have fixed rates of 7.60%.

And because rates for new PLUS loans change every year, if you have more than one parent PLUS loan, each loan likely has a different rate. Since 2006, rates have been as low as 6.31% and as high as 8.50%.

Refinancing PLUS loans is more common than ever, and it’s easy to combine multiple loans into one new loan with one rate. And, with private lenders, the rates you are offered are based on your credit, not a number set by the federal government for everyone. The better your credit, the lower the interest rate you will be offered.

Keep in mind: Many lenders offer online tools to provide you with a rate quote or pre-qualification offer. Some companies make you create an account before getting their information, so be sure they are only making a “soft” inquiry into your credit history or that their website states the information will not impact your credit score.

Want to see what rates you would get with our refinance loan?

If you don’t qualify to refinance your parent PLUS loans with a private lender, you have the option to consolidate those federal loans through the U.S. Department of Education. If you apply for a Direct Consolidation Loan, the interest rates of your current federal loans are used to determine your new consolidation loan rate, though, so you may not see a lower overall rate. Learn more about the differences between consolidating and refinancing with our Beginner’s Guide to Student Loan Refinance.

2. When you want to lower your payment

Parent PLUS loans are owned by the federal government, and, along with being fairly easy to get, they have a basic repayment term of 10 years. The federal government offers extended repayment, up to 25 years, to borrowers who owe more than $30,000 in PLUS loans. But what if your current remaining term or the amount you owe each month doesn’t work for you?

If you are looking to lower your payments, whether it’s to save for today, help other children with college costs or plan for your retirement, refinancing can get you a longer term. Many lenders have terms ranging from 5 to 20 years with multiple options in between.

The trade-off for a longer term with a refinance loan is that you will likely pay more in interest over the life of the loan. However, reputable lenders won’t penalize you for paying extra whenever you wish, which will reduce overall interest costs. You may feel like a longer-term loan, which doesn’t require high monthly payments and allows for extra payments at any time, provides a financial safety net.

If you’d like to see how repaying at a lower rate or with a different repayment term can impact your overall costs and monthly payment, or if you want to learn more about the benefit implications of refinancing federal loans into a new private loan, check out our Beginner’s Guide to Student Loan Refinance.

Keep in mind: Refinance loans with shorter term lengths typically provide the lowest rates that you see advertised. But even loans with longer terms often have rates lower than federal PLUS loan rates.

3. When you need a change

Refinancing your existing parent PLUS loans (or any other education loans in your name) lets you reset your loan; at today’s terms and on your terms.

When you and your child were reviewing financial aid award letters and trying to understand the different types of financial aid and student loans was likely a busy, stressful time. When you first signed paperwork for those loans, you may not have had enough time to fully consider the differences between federal loans for students and PLUS loans for parents and the financial impacts of taking out parent PLUS loans.

Today is a new day, and you can find that right mix of fixed interest rates and terms to set yourself up for financial success going forward. Take time to check out your different options, and determine how different rates, payments and terms will impact your short- and long-term budgets. Without the stress of making decisions quickly to pay college bills on time, you can find the right loan for you today.

Keep in mind: The better your credit, the lower rates you will be offered for the different loan terms available. The great thing with the refinance loans offered by most lenders is that you are able to select the rate and term combination that is right for you.

4. When it’s not you, it’s them. (The servicer that is.)

Education loans are long-term financial commitments, and like all long-term commitments, your partner plays an important role. With federal parent PLUS loans, you probably didn’t pick that partner, and maybe it’s just not working out. Maybe they aren’t giving you the attention you deserve. Maybe they’re a large corporation that cares more about profits than customer service. Or maybe they are constantly trying to sell you more or different financial products.

Whatever the reason, you can get away and pick your new partner. Lenders today offer a range of benefits like rate reductions for automatic payments or for military service. Many also have policies in place to forgive loans in the event of unfortunate circumstances. Now’s your chance to take a look around and make the choice your own.

Start by learning more about us and all the details on our refinance loan.

Keep in mind: Some lenders detail their repayment benefits and policies on their websites, while you may have to call and ask others for more details. Do you want to work with a lender who is transparent and provides all the information you are seeking in the manner you prefer? If you speak with representatives on the phone, are they pleasant and helpful or do they try to get you off the phone quickly without providing the information you need?

Ready to refinance?

Regardless of your situation, if you’re considering refinancing your parent PLUS loans, it’s important to spend time weighing your options and finding the right loan and lender for you. What do you not like about your current loans? What does work now? What would be ideal in a new refinance loan?

Want to know how we can help?

Iowa Student Loan offers the Reset Refinance Loan with a rates and terms to help meet your needs. We are a nonprofit business that focuses on Iowa students and families, but we proudly provide “Iowa nice” customer service no matter where you call home. Pre-qualify today and we’ll provide you with rate and term options specific to your situation.

Get Your Rate

By: Iowa Student Loan

What Your Financial Aid Award Letter Doesn’t Tell You

The daily life of a college student is filled with associated costs. Many of these are detailed in the financial aid award letters and packets colleges send out, but other expenses can add up.

Don’t forget to plan for expenses like these listed below when estimating your cost of attendance. Having a clear idea of all your expenses upfront will allow you to better plan how you will pay for college.

Class or major-specific materials and fees

Your award letter probably provides an average cost for books and materials, but depending on specific classes, you may need to budget more. For example, you may need to purchase specialty art or lab supplies, specific software or even tickets to local performances or speakers for certain classes.

Social and pre-professional dues and fees

Fraternities, sororities, pre-professional societies, clubs and student organizations often have membership fees, as well as costs associated with special events, trips, conferences and clothing.

Entertainment costs

Sporting events, concerts, movies and other entertainment can add up. In addition, you may need to pay for cable or another TV subscription service, dining outside of a meal plan, snacks, beverages and more.

Printing and photocopy fees

While the world of academics is progressively moving toward electronic communication, you may need to print materials, signs, resumes and portfolios for presentations, interviews and other occasions. You may have a printing allowance included in the cost of attendance, but watch especially for limits on color, 3-D and other specialty printing.

Clothing

Besides an initial outlay for clothes appropriate for the weather and fashions at a specific school, students often buy new clothes for theme days or holidays, special events, interviews and jobs. Don’t forget to budget spirit wear for game days.

Extra travel

Many college award letters list an average amount for transportation. This may not cover your specific costs for travel to and from a faraway home or travel expenses for study abroad, internships or co-ops, conferences, service trips or even trips over breaks. If you take a car to college, you may have parking, insurance and maintenance costs on and off campus, or you may end up paying for cabs, Uber, trains or buses if you don’t have a car available.

Bank and financial fees

If your financial institution doesn’t have a branch on or near campus, you may be responsible for extra fees for using the ATM. Colleges may also charge fees if you choose to use a payment plan or to pay your tuition bill by certain methods.

Health and fitness expenses

If a college doesn’t include membership to a campus fitness center in its fees, you may need to budget for that expense. In addition, physical therapy or personal training services may be available only at an extra charge.

Health insurance

On a related note, consider whether there are extra fees for using your family health insurance in the college area. Many colleges offer their own insurance plans and automatically enroll students. Check with the college to determine if you are being charged for health insurance and how you can avoid paying for double coverage.

Parent travel

If you don’t attend college close to home, your parents may find themselves paying to travel to and stay in the college community several times a year, either for visits, special events or college functions like orientation and family day. This may affect the amount your parents are able to provide for other college-related expenses.

Renter or dorm insurance

You and your family may want to consider an additional policy or increase current insurance coverage in case of loss or theft of personal items at college. Insurance may cover contents of a dorm room or off-campus housing, bikes and computers, as well as other items.

Storage or shipping for breaks

If you attend college far from home, items that can’t be reasonably carted home will need to be either shipped or stored when the dorm closes for the year or while you are between off-campus leases.

Student loan interest

All student loans begin accruing daily interest from the moment they are disbursed to the school or the student. The federal government will pay interest on subsidized federal loans while you are in school at least half-time, but all other student loans have that interest added to the total repayment amount, which can significantly increase the amount you must repay. Choosing to pay interest during the school years can offset the accrual; otherwise, you will need to include that added interest in financial plans for the future.

You may have additional expenses not listed here based on your personal situation. Remember, you will need to repay any student loans with interest on your starting salary after leaving school, so consider how you can pay for these expenses as they arise without borrowing too much.

Iowa Student Loan has several tools to help you plan for college and life afterward. View our smart borrowing tools here.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Beginner’s Guide to Refinancing Your Student Loans

Repaying student loans can be stressful but refinancing may help make your life a bit easier. Here are three reasons refinancing may be a good choice for you.

  • Refinancing may lower your interest rate to help you reduce overall costs.
  • A new loan with a longer term may lower your monthly payment, which can help with other debt obligations or living expenses.
  • Refinancing lets you simplify repayment by bringing all your student loans together so you only have one student loan payment a month.

There are many things to consider before jumping into refinancing, though. Use this guide to determine whether or not it is a good option for you.

How does student loan refinancing work?

Student loan refinancing allows you to gather all or some of your loans into one new loan, often at a lower interest rate that may help you pay less over time or provide you with a longer repayment term that will lower your monthly payment. This is a great option if you have multiple student loans, but you can also refinance if you have just one loan.

Is there a difference between student loan refinancing and consolidation?

Yes; although the terms are often interchangeable. Student loan consolidation most often refers to the federal program. Student loan refinancing usually refers to programs offered by private lenders.

What is student loan consolidation?

Consolidation typically refers to combining your federal student loans into one new federal loan with a new term. It does not necessarily provide a lower interest rate as your new rate will be the weighted average of the interest rates on the loans being consolidated. Student loan consolidation is not usually considered a money-saving option. With a consolidation loan, though, you may be eligible for different income-driven repayment plans and certain loan forgiveness programs as long as PLUS Loans for parents are not included when you consolidate.

How is student loan refinancing different?

Refinancing is offered by some banks, credit unions and other specialized student loan lenders. This type of loan allows you to combine federal and / or private loans together for a new rate and term. Repaying with a lower interest rate, and thus lowering your overall costs, is one of the main benefits of refinancing. Rates are generally determined based on your current financial strength. Cosigners can help you qualify if you are fresh out of college and don’t have much credit built up yet as well as help you obtain lower rates.

  Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Private Student Refinance Loan
What type of student loans are eligible? Federal Federal and private
Do I need to meet specific credit criteria? No Yes
Can this simplify repayment? Yes Yes
Will this reduce my interest rate? Not significantly Possibly; depending on your current loans and your credit score today

What are your student loan refinancing goals?

In general, most people only think about refinancing if they believe they’ll get a lower interest rate, but that is not the only reason to refinance. If you’re considering a refinance loan, it’s important to find the loan that can help you meet your goals.

Do you want to pay less overall?

Refinancing your loans to repay at a lower interest rate is the most common reason people state they want to refinance. If that is your goal and you qualify for a lower interest rate loan, refinancing can definitely help you pay less overall. Just be sure the new loan term is similar to the remaining terms on your existing loans. If you qualify for a lower interest rate but choose a longer repayment term than your current loans, you likely will not pay less over the life of a loan.

You can also choose a shorter repayment term to reduce your overall cost, although that often means higher monthly payment amounts.

The best way to reduce costs over the life of the loan, if you can afford the higher monthly payments, is to refinance to a loan with a lower interest rate and a shorter repayment term.

Are you looking to lower the amount you pay each month?

If your current monthly student loan payment amount is too high or you’re struggling to make payments on time and have enough money left over for living expenses, refinancing to a new loan with a longer repayment term is an option. You will likely pay more over time as interest accrues daily on student loans. This means that the longer you’re repaying a loan, the more interest you will pay. One strategy to keep in mind if you need lower payments now and decide to refinance to a longer repayment term is to pay extra as your budget changes in the future. That way your loan can be paid in full sooner and you will pay less in interest.

Would you like to only make one payment each month?

Another popular reason to consider refinancing is to stop making multiple payments to different lenders each month. If you refinance all your loans into one new loan, you will only have to make one payment each month instead of remembering to pay all the lenders monthly.

Are there drawbacks to refinancing student loans?

Refinancing may help you save money and simplify student loan repayment, but there are a few things to consider before refinancing. Not all student loans are the same and you’ll want to research the benefits and repayment options different refinance lenders offer.

Federal student loans have benefits and repayment options that are not available for private student loans. If you choose to refinance federal loans into a private loan, you will lose the federal loan benefits that go along with them. Most federal student loans come with different options for repayment, such as income-driven repayment plans, as well as more deferment and forbearance options and loan forgiveness programs for certain borrowers. These vary depending on the type of federal loan. Federal PLUS Loans for parents do not have the same benefits as federal loans made to student borrowers.

If you do not foresee any difficulty making your minimum payments and you do not intend to apply for a federal loan forgiveness program, then refinancing federal loans into a new private refinance loan may be a viable option for you.

Private student loans vary by lender. Research your current lender’s repayment plans and the options for you to postpone payments should you run into a short period of financial hardship, as you may lose those benefits if you refinance. A new refinance lender may offer similar or different benefits and assistance options.

Will applying to refinance your student loans hurt your credit score?

Refinancing student loans doesn’t typically impact credit scores significantly.

When considering your options, check to see if the lender offers a pre-qualification option that provides you with the rates and terms you are eligible for before making a decision to apply. Most of the time, this step does not impact your credit at all since it only involves a soft credit inquiry.

Once you complete an application and authorize a full credit inquiry, your credit score may be impacted a bit but typically only by a few points. If, however, you apply for loans with multiple lenders over a period of time, your credit score may be impacted more.

What do lenders look at when you apply to refinance?

Lenders review a few main factors about your credit history when you apply to refinance as they want to know you will be able to repay your new loan. As with most loans, they consider your credit score and payment history as well as your income and debt levels.

Before refinancing, you may want to know your credit score to see if you are eligible for better rates. It’s important to understand, though, that credit scores vary based on the consumer reporting agency and the calculation used, so the credit score you see from one source may not match the one the lender uses.

What steps should you take to refinance your student loans?

If you think refinancing is a good option for you, take these steps to refinance your student loans.

  1. Determine your goals when it comes to student loans.
    • Are you looking to lower your interest rate?
    • Do you want to lower your monthly payment amount?
    • Is simplifying student loan repayment so you have just one monthly payment important?
    • Do you hope refinancing will result in a combination of the above?
  2. Review your current student loan status.
    • Do you have federal and private, only private, or only federal student loans?
    • Who is your loan servicer?
    • Are your current interest rates fixed or variable?
    • What are your current interest rates? How many years are left until your current loans are fully repaid and what are your payment amounts now?
  3. Seek the best lender to fit your financial needs.
    • Does the lender provide customer service on its own loans? Or will your loan be sent to another company for servicing?
    • Does the lender have a good reputation for customer service?
    • Is the lender solely focused on student loans? Or does it have other products they’d like to sell you?
    • What sort of repayment plans, hardship assistance options and benefits does the lender offer?
  4. See if you can pre-qualify or get a rate quote before you complete an application. This will let you assess your new interest rates and repayment term options and determine if refinancing is the right option for you.
  5. If you decide to proceed, submit an application to be approved for refinancing.

Feelin’ good about refinancing?

Complete our pre-qualification process to see what rates you can receive. There’s no credit impact, and you only have to answer a few quick questions to reset your student loans and reduce your stress!

Get Your Rate

By: Iowa Student Loan

Understanding Your Financial Aid Award Package

While college acceptance letters are often exciting, the arrival of financial aid award packages can be confusing. Keep these five things in mind as you review your financial aid awards to limit stress.

Financial aid is not all free money.

Depending on the college or university, financial aid may be presented under one large heading or broken down by type. Remember that work-study and loans, including federal and supplemental loans, are also part of financial aid packages. Work-study requires you to find and obtain work on campus, and loans must be paid back with interest after you graduate or leave college.

Cost of attendance varies by college.

Like the types of aid offered, college costs may be presented differently by different institutions. Tuition and fees may be grouped together or separated; room and board may be called housing and meals; and estimated expenses for books, transportation and miscellaneous may or may not be listed. You may also see tuition, fees, housing and meals listed as direct costs, while other expenses are shown as indirect costs because they are not billed by the school. Remember, many indirect costs are estimates or averages, and you may spend less or budget more depending on your situation. Be sure you understand what is included in each category to get a true comparison between schools.

Work-study requires work now.

If your award package includes a line for work-study, don’t assume the college will have a job waiting for you when you arrive on campus in the fall. As soon as you decide on a college, touch base with the financial aid office to determine what steps you need to take to get a job on campus. Then, apply for the job(s) you are interested in or seek out other opportunities to count on that money coming in once you start classes.

Outside scholarships may impact your award package.

You need to report any scholarships or grants you receive from sources outside of the government or college to the financial aid office. While those outside scholarships may reduce the aid you’re eligible to receive, they can also help you borrow less if you need loans, so don’t be afraid of finding as much outside free money as possible.

Expenses may increase and free aid may decrease after your freshman year.

College tuition, on-campus housing and meal plans will likely cost more each year you’re in school. Grants and scholarships you’re offered to attend a college as a freshman, on the other hand, may decrease in future years. Find out if scholarships and grants are for one year or if they are renewable. If they can be renewed each year, be sure you understand any requirements you must meet to keep those awards. Also, be aware that maximum federal loan amounts may increase every year you’re in college, but those funds will need to be paid back with interest in the future. It is a good idea to estimate total college costs to earn your degree so you can make a realistic plan to pay for your entire college career.

By: Iowa Student Loan

5 Things Parents Should Know About Award Letters

Your student filed the FAFSA and just received the first financial aid award letter from a college. Your student may be happy as this is yet another step in the process taking them ever closer to move-in day. But before accepting admission, it’s important you take a look and ensure the offered financial aid is right for your family’s situation. Here are a few things to consider when reviewing your student’s award letter.

1. Award letters can come in a variety of formats.

If your student receives an award letter from multiple colleges, they may not look the same. This can make comparing costs and awarded aid a bit tricky and confusing but there are ways to get an accurate comparison.

It’s important to compare like costs and like awarded aid. Consider additional listed costs or aid separately. If you get confused, using a spreadsheet or table that breaks down amounts might help. The U.S. Department of Education offers a shopping sheet that can provide a template.

2. Colleges often include the maximum available federal student and parent loans on the award letter.

If you have other means to pay, such as newly anticipated income, savings, gifts or a 529 college savings plan, you can decline the offered loans entirely or update the awarded loan amounts to a lesser value. You don’t have to accept the full amount of awarded loans.

3. Loans listed on the award letter could include federal PLUS loans for parents.

These loans allow parents to supplement the student’s awarded aid to better cover the cost of attendance. These loans enter repayment immediately and are entirely the responsibility of the parent — not the student. Be sure to review your student’s award letter carefully and discuss loan options and responsibilities.

4. You may notice awarded aid doesn’t fully cover all costs.

You have some options when it comes to covering the remaining costs. First, contact the school’s financial aid office and inform them of your situation. They may be able to offer monthly payment plans or suggest other options such as private student loans.

5. When reviewing your student’s award letter, keep in mind that other costs will come up during the course of your student’s college career.

Award letters often do not take into consideration additional or extra costs. Other costs that may not be included in the award letter are spending money if your student chooses to attend concerts, sporting events or other activities. Organizations your student chooses to join may also come with membership fees not detailed in the award letter. So be sure you or your student have some extra money set aside for these situations.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Minimize Your Student Loan Debt: Declining Awarded Student Loans

Colleges sometimes include the maximum available federal student and parent loans on financial aid award letters to bring the amount of awarded financial aid closer to the total cost of attendance. It’s not always clear that students don’t need to accept the full amount of all loans.

Reducing expenses or increasing earnings to offset awarded loans will mean less debt after graduation. Not only would the amount of the student loans need to be repaid, but so will interest that accrues daily on those loans. And, it won’t matter if college doesn’t result in graduation, a job or the anticipated earnings. Once the loan has been accepted, the student (or parents in the case of a federal PLUS Loan for parents) is responsible for repaying it.

If the awarded loan amount seems like more than the student will really need, it’s important to decide exactly how much to borrow.

Need some, but not all, of the awarded federal student loan amount?

Students can always accept only the loan amount they need. To take a partial loan amount:

  • Fill in the desired loan amount on the document to be returned to the financial aid office if a paper copy needs to be signed and returned.
  • Choose the electronic option for accepting or declining each applicable loan, or for taking out a partial loan amount, when accepting financial aid online.
  • Contact the financial aid office if it’s not clear how to accept a partial award.

Can all loans be declined?

Many students have the goal to attend college loan-free. Even if some loans will eventually be needed, declining all loans for one semester will save capitalized interest later on. To decline the offered loans:

  • Cross out the loan amount or select the “decline” option on the document to be returned to the financial aid office.
  • Choose the electronic option for declining each applicable loan if financial aid is accepted online.
  • Contact the financial aid office if it’s not clear how to decline loans.

Considering PLUS Loans?

Although PLUS Loans may appear to be part of the awarded financial aid, they are not automatically paid to the student or institution. Parents need to request these loans. Your family may wish to compare the terms and benefits of a PLUS Loan with those, like our College Family Loan, offered by private lenders. These loans may have different fees or interest rates. Be sure to discuss repayment expectations as a family if parents will be responsible for repaying the PLUS or other loan debt.

By: Iowa Student Loan

10 Budget Tips for Spring Break (Infographic)

Download Infographic as a PDF.

Spring break can mean fun, sun and no worries, unless you blow your budget. Use these tips to help you stay on track during break and save your money for your education.

1. Plan ahead.

Start scouting for sales and less-expensive options early. Check out flights, hotels, destinations and activities so you don’t pay more for last-minute decisions. Read reviews of the activities or venues you want to include to see if they’re worth the cost. Also, pack everything you’re likely to need to avoid tourist prices on sunscreen, sunglasses, raingear, chargers and attire.

2. Take a cheaper flight.

Airfare is expensive, especially during high traffic times like spring break. But you can save some money by flying discount airlines, at off-peak times and days, non-direct and through alternate airports. In addition, check to see whether you can save by sitting separately from your companions and avoiding baggage fees.

3. Drive or ride instead of flying.

Buses and trains may get you where you want to go at a big savings. Or, get together with friends to share a road trip to your destination. These may take longer than flying but can be as much fun as the destination.

4. Take the road less traveled.

The beaches of the eastern seaboard are often less crowded than those of Florida, Mexico or Texas during spring break and can offer savings. Maybe this is the ideal time for you to explore the mountains or the desert and avoid the party scene.

5. Stay for less.

Apps and sites like Airbnb, VRBO and hostels.com can point you to less expensive lodging wherever you decide to go. Consider camping if you’re driving—government-owned sites are often least expensive, and you can even rent camping gear. To spend even less, stay with someone you know. Check out options for your final destination and lodging along the way.

6. Save on activities.

Look for discounts before you go through memberships like Costco and AAA, as well as apps like RoadTrippers, Groupon and Living Social. Also, an Internet search may turn up promotional codes you can use when you book. Once you arrive, some places may offer a discount if you show your student ID, and look for coupon books in the lobbies of hotels.

7. Save on food.

Depending on how you’re traveling, it may make sense to stock up on food for meals and snacks as well as beverages before you leave. If you’re flying, look for discount chains once you arrive. Preparing your own food will save on high restaurant and venue costs. See more tips for budget dining on spring break. <link to other post>

8. Avoid impulse buying.

It’s tempting to pick up a memento of your trip or to indulge yourself. Think about whether that coconut mug or t-shirt will get any use when you get back, or if the signature drink is worth the cost. Set a budget for each day and stick to it. You could even only bring the amount of cash you want to spend with you, leaving your credit card and extra cash in the hotel safe.

9. Use your legs.

Instead of renting a car, taking cabs or using Uber, consider renting a bike or simply walking where you need to go at your destination.

10. Stay out of trouble.

Avoid large fines and penalties by knowing and abiding by the laws at your destination, including those for driving, consuming alcoholic beverages and noise.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Working During Spring Break

How much money can you save by working over spring break instead of going on a trip? The specific answer depends on several circumstances, but the average savings could be in the thousands of dollars. Here’s a breakdown.

Assume you make $9 an hour and work eight hours a day for six days of a nine-day break. Your earnings after taxes would be $375.

Add to that your savings for not traveling to a typical spring break destination, which could be over $1,000. See how you can apply these earnings to college expenses.

Earnings  
Hourly Wage $9
Hours Worked Over Break (9 Days) 48
Net Earnings After Taxes $375
Savings  
Average Flight + Hotel Cost (5-Night Stay) See source $1,077
Total (Net Earnings + Travel Savings) $1,452

By: Iowa Student Loan

12 New Year’s Resolutions for College Students

NewYears-Resolutions

The new year is a good time to evaluate what’s been working — and what hasn’t — for you at college and figure out ways to improve in the future.

Here are 12 popular resolutions for college students. Which ones should you adopt for yourself?

1. Improve your sleep habits.

Do you get too little sleep or have trouble getting out of bed for your first class? Resolve to get an adequate amount of sleep each night and make the changes necessary to ensure it happens.

2. Get fit.

You probably remember where the exercise facilities on your campus are. If you don’t like the gym atmosphere, or the hours or location aren’t convenient for you, find other ways to get your exercise — go for a daily walk or run, join an intramural sports team or create your own weekly competitions with friends.

3. Eat better.

Are you making healthful choices in the dining center? Do you eat too much fast food or easy-to-cook convenience foods? Stock up on healthy snacks while you’re at home over the holidays and make a resolution to replace more meals each week with a more nutritious alternative.

4. Add (or drop) an extracurricular activity.

Are you too busy going to club and society events that you don’t have time for studying or other activities? Or, are you bored and looking for a reason to get out of your room? Evaluate your activity level and consider whether you should join a new club or quit an existing one.

5. Try something new this semester.

College is an ideal time to study abroad, make new friends or take off for an impromptu (but still safe) road trip. You may never again have the same freedom and opportunity to try such a variety of things. Take advantage of it.

6. Speak up in class.

Even if you’re mostly in large lecture classes, go ahead and ask your question or voice your opinion. It may be embarrassing at first, but you’ll find it helps you be more involved and you may discover others who share your ideas. (And, it usually makes a good impression on the instructor!)

7. Set a savings goal.

Can you save money by renting or buying used textbooks? How about reducing your daily spending? Set a goal for yourself and see if you can reach it by the end of the semester. Find ideas for saving money during college with Student Loan Game Plan.

8. Get classwork organized.

Use a calendar system to plan out study times, course work, projects and papers for the new semester’s classes to ensure you meet deadlines.

9. Be a leader.

Find a leadership opportunity to build skills for your future career. Many organizations will take nominations and hold elections for next year’s officers sometime in the spring. If you prefer more casual leadership, take control of a study group or play an integral role on a house or campus committee.

10. Improve grades.

Unless you managed a 4.0 last semester, you have room to improve your grades. Evaluate the reasons you missed points on tests, papers and projects and make a plan to do better.

11. Invest in a good outfit.

Are you ready for on-campus interviews and career fairs? How about networking events? Make sure you have at least one professional suit or outfit. If cash is tight, check out consignment stores. Some campuses even offer professional outfits for free or a small fee to students through their career services department.

12. Try one career preparation strategy.

Visit your campus career services and get help with a resume, apply for an internship or job, participate in a mock interview or another activity. You’ll make connections with the career services staff and you’ll improve your chances at landing a future position.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Five Tips for Cutting Costs in the New Year

Jan17-TipsCuttingCosts

If one of your goals is to reduce expenses next year so you have more to save or spend on essentials, these five tips to cut costs can help, regardless of what you usually spend money on or where you shop.

1. Look for sales or discounts.

Consumer items tend to be priciest when they first come out in stores. You can often find the same item on sale if you are willing to wait a while. Also look for discounts on similar but older versions, bulk purchases and out-of-season merchandise. Websites and apps are available to let you know when specific items go on sale.

2. Shop secondhand.

Secondhand stores and online sites allow you to purchase good-condition books, clothes, video games and really, almost anything, used. Besides saving you money, buying secondhand also does the environment a good turn by reducing trash and manufacturing.

3. Make it at home.

Coffee, tea, breakfast sandwiches, lunches and most food items can be made at home for less than you’d spend at your local drive-thru. Recipes and instructions also can be found online for beauty and hygiene products, cleaning supplies, home décor and gifts that you can make less expensively yourself.

4. Swap with friends.

If you and your friends share interests, you may be able to save money by trading clothes, video games and systems, books and supplies that you’ve grown tired of but are still in good shape. A temporary swap can allow you to break out of your rut without spending more money. You may want to consider discussing what to do in case of damage.

5. Go without or use less.

If you’re paying for a monthly subscription, impulse buys or expensive but not necessary purchases, decide how you can get by with less or go without completely. You may be able to downgrade your phone plan, drop cable TV for a cheaper subscription or service, hit the library for books and magazines, or kick a habit that is costing you money and convenience.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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