12 New Year’s Resolutions for High School Seniors

jan17-newyearresolutions

The final year of high school may feel like a time to settle in and enjoy the familiar. With a big life change coming up, however, the start of a new calendar year might facilitate a few changes to get ready for even larger ones later.

Here are 12 resolutions for college-bound high school seniors.

1. Get excited about college.

It’s natural to feel sad about leaving high school behind, but resolve to think instead about the new opportunities waiting for you in a few months. Regardless of how far from home your college is, you will have a chance to make new friends and to discover new things about yourself and the world. Let go of any resentment about what didn’t go right in high school and prepare to be open minded about new horizons.

2. Finish strong academically.

Remember that your college will need your final transcript, so don’t let your grades drop once you’ve been accepted. If you’re taking dual enrollment, Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) classes, remember that you may need to achieve certain grades or test scores to be able to receive credit for required classes at your college.

3. Learn how to adult.

Very soon, you will be responsible for getting yourself out of bed and to class or work on time. You’ll also need to know how to take care of laundry, handle financial matters, advocate for yourself and much more. Make a list of things you’ll need to know how to do on your own and start checking items off.

4. Know what needs to be done for college.

If you’ve made your final college decision, make sure you understand what is needed next. You may need to make enrollment and housing deposits, reserve a spot at orientation, select housing and roommates and visit the doctor for vaccinations or checkups. You may also need to contact other institutions you applied to and let them know you aren’t planning to attend. If you haven’t yet committed to a college, check the deadlines for the top contenders to ensure you don’t miss any.

5. Save or make money.

Besides the large expenses of tuition, fees, housing, books and other costs of college attendance, you’ll need money for daily expenses, transportation and more. Resolve to spend less between now and the day you leave for college and make a goal to land a job to earn additional cash if possible.

6. Make memories.

Even though you’ll spend a lot of time thinking about and preparing for college, also try to be present in the moment. Enjoy your hometown friends and family while you’re with them.

7. Say thank you.

Many people have probably helped you get where you are right now. Teachers, mentors, coaches, recommenders, your parents and others may deserve and will undoubtedly appreciate your thanks. Be specific about how they’ve helped or inspired you and let your relationship guide you on whether a handwritten note or an in-person gesture is best.

8. Apply for scholarships.

It’s never too late to apply for scholarships to help you manage your college expenses. Start with a search on your college’s website or a call to the admissions or financial aid office. You may be eligible for competitive or automatic awards from the college, your academic department or other providers. Also search on scholarship websites and check with your school counselor for outside scholarships. And, finally, remember to explore offerings from your own and your family’s employers, financial institutions, community and religious organizations, and other outside sources.

9. Leave a positive impression.

If you will soon need to end your involvement in an organization or activity, plan a way to leave a lasting legacy. You may be able to spearhead a special campaign, pass a project or advice on to another member, or put forth your best effort.

10. Create your own future.

Many seniors who have been deferred or denied by their top choice college feel as though they are settling for second best. Remember, regardless of admission decisions, your success is more about you than any one college path. Resolve to always be your best and seek out opportunity no matter where you’re headed next fall.

11. Weigh financing options.

If you haven’t yet, you’ll soon receive your college’s financial aid packet detailing the financial aid you are eligible to receive as a student at that institution. Carefully consider how you can limit borrowing. If your financial aid doesn’t cover cost of attendance and you need to think about private loans, compare your options for the best fit for your situation.

12. Set goals for the next phase.

Most college freshmen plan to graduate college and find a job after obtaining a degree. Think about specific and incremental goals that will help you reach that main objective. Consider whether you want to or should maintain a certain GPA; find and participate in internships, co-ops or other career-related work; complete research; join student organizations or graduate debt-free.

By: Iowa Student Loan