New Tool Helps Students Make Informed Grad School Decision

Iowa Student Loan Encourages Grad Degree Candidates to Consider Future Debt

Iowa Student Loan has a new online tool to help students make informed decisions about their borrowing levels and their ability to successfully repay new student loan debt when considering the pursuit of an advanced degree.

The Grad Degree Gauge is a free tool available online.

Users are encouraged to consider their current and potential annual salaries with and without the new graduate degree; previous and future borrowing to pay for their education; and opportunities in a career associated with the intended graduate degree.

“I felt [the Grad Degree Gauge] was extremely helpful,” said Jordan Doetkott, a first-year graduate student studying organizational leadership at Grand View University in Des Moines. “It was very user friendly and a great asset to someone pursuing a master’s degree….it was straightforward and easy to navigate.”

The results are displayed as a number on a 0–100 gauge. The overall result is a composite of four indicators:

  • Current student loan debt in addition to maximum advisable new student loan debt
  • Anticipated salary change from the amount expected to be earned by holders of the previous degree, or the user’s actual salary if the user is currently in the workforce, to the amount expected to be earned by holders of the intended graduate degree
  • Number of new jobs in the indicated career by 2024 as projected by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Percentage of people working in the indicated career who have a graduate degree as indicated by the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics

“A lot of factors can come into play when people decide whether it makes sense to pursue an advanced degree,” said Steve McCullough, president and CEO of Iowa Student Loan. “We want the ability to repay student loan debt to be one of the main things that students think about, whether they are continuing their education straight from a previous degree or going back to school after being in the workforce.”

 

Additional Resources
Also being debuted by Iowa Student Loan is the Parent Handbook, which consists of valuable tips that help families of students in sixth through 12th grades prepare for success in college and other postsecondary options. The Handbook is designed to address common questions and provide a roadmap for academic and financial success.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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15 Ideas for Making Money During Winter Break

Depending on your school’s calendar, you may have from two to four weeks away from school with little or no academic commitments, which leaves you plenty of time to earn extra cash which could be used to reduce your need for student loans or allow you to pay interest on current student loans to reduce your balance.

MoneyOverWinterBreak-infographic

Download a PDF of this infographic

Here are 15 ways you can make money over your break.

  1. Find a paid internship. Make money and gain valuable experience at the same time. Check with your campus career services office for available opportunities near campus, or contact companies in your field close to home.
  1. Apply for scholarships. Spend several hours researching and applying for the scholarships you were too busy to look at during the academic session.
  1. Work retail. Many retailers take on seasonal staff to help with the preholiday rush, post-holiday sales and gift returns.
  1. Turn your existing part-time job or internship into a full-time position. Your employer may jump at the chance to give you more hours to offset other employees’ vacation time or to help handle year-end projects.
  1. Babysit for busy parents. Besides the extra commitment of holiday parties and travel, many parents also seek temporary, full-time sitters for school-age children at home during winter break.
  1. Take care of Fido (and Bessie). Pet owners who will be away for an extended period of time may prefer to have a responsible person come in to feed, exercise and clean up after their furry friends. If you live in or near a rural area, don’t forget that farmers often need someone to take care of their stock every day. Advertise early to line up several commitments over break.
  1. Be a house-sitter. Homeowners will often pay a responsible person to stay in their home, water plants, set out garbage and take care of other tasks while they are away for a long trip.
  1. Sell your stuff. While you’re at home over break, take the opportunity to go through clothes, electronics, books and other belongings you no longer need. You can take them to consignment shops or sell them yourself online.
  1. Be the designated driver. With holiday parties in full swing, more and more people turn to Uber and other driving services.
  1. Promotional campaigns. Offer your tech and social media savvy to businesses who want to promote products or holiday sales. A few hours of your time can be worth a lot of money to business owners who don’t have the time or knowledge to set up their own campaigns.
  1. Put your creations up for sale. If you’re artistic or crafty, a little time designing holiday cards, decorations or gifts can pay off when you sell them online or at flea markets.
  1. Fill in on or near campus. It may sound strange to spend your break on campus, but if you have a place to stay, you may be able to find a temporary position taking shifts for other students who’ve gone home. The bookstore, area shops and campus offices may need help preparing for the spring semester while some of their regular staff is out.
  1. Teach a class. Work with local gyms, libraries and shops to set up special classes in something you know well and can teach others — a great workout for sedentary office workers, a how-to for smartphones or apps, creative cooking for the budget-conscious.
  1. Do the legwork. Do any local businesses need help distributing fliers or making holiday deliveries? While you’re doing your own holiday shopping, keep an eye out for an opportunity to offer your services.
  1. Take care of not-so-odd jobs. Advertise your availability to run errands, wrap gifts, hang holiday lights and shovel snow.

 By: Iowa Student Loan

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Plan and Portion for College Success

Thanksgiving is a time to reflect and gather with family, but a successful holiday often requires advance planning and thoughtful portions of each element. Success after high school can be accomplished in the same way: having a plan in mind and accomplishing it in portions beginning as early as middle school.

Portion One: Determining Options

The first step is often considering the options available to your student. Will your child pursue a military career, a trade apprenticeship, a two-year degree or certificate, a four-year bachelor’s degree, or a professional degree spanning years of education and training?

Even if you and your student don’t have a clear determination yet, exploring the options — including important considerations like cost and entrance requirements — will lay the foundation for the following portions.

Portion Two: Financial Planning

Using the options found above, you and your student can explore costs for possible education or training programs and start to plan ways to pay. Look at average costs and costs at the high and low ends of the spectrum, as well as the recent history of cost increases to get an idea of how much your student might be expected to pay in total for his or her education.

Will you need to increase the amount you’re currently saving for postsecondary education? What other options, like college savings accounts, will be useful to you from a tax and financial standpoint? You may wish to consult a financial planner or tax adviser who is knowledgeable about paying for college for assistance.

Portion Three: Academic Requirements

Using some of the education options from above as a guide, determine the entrance requirements for each so you can make a plan for academics through high school. Options to take specialized or advanced classes may be available as early as middle school to allow for more of the same at the high school level.

Consider whether dual enrollment, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Project Lead the Way or other high school programs will allow your student to earn transferrable credits that cost much less than tuition. School and college counselors can often point students to programs that are most suitable for their goals.

Additionally, explore standardized test score and GPA requirements for admission and for specialized honors, merit or other programs. A goal helps your student understand why it’s worthwhile to complete homework and prepare for the ACT or SAT.

Portion 4: Scholarships

As high school graduation approaches, you and your student can start to look for scholarship opportunities that will provide funding for college or other postsecondary options. Knowing the requirements for earning specific scholarships ahead of time allows your student time to do what is needed to qualify.

Scholarships are often awarded by colleges and corporations for academic or athletic achievement, but other opportunities that don’t require specific accomplishments are available. Check into whether scholarships are offered by parents’ and student’s employers, organizations your student is involved in, community organizations and leagues, local businesses and the state and federal governments, as well as other sources.

Portion 5: Aid Application

Beginning the fall of your student’s senior year in high school, you and your child may begin completing financial aid applications to have a better idea of expected cost. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is an online application that you and your student complete to qualify for federal and state aid (including grants, work-study and loans) and for financial aid awarded by colleges. Some colleges also require another application to award aid from their own resources.

Your student need not have made a final college choice when completing financial aid applications, but the colleges listed on the FAFSA that have accepted your student for admission will generate a financial aid award packet that lists your student’s expected costs for attendance, your family’s expected contribution from savings and earnings based on the information provided on the financial aid application, and the aid that college will award your student. These packages are meant to help your family make an informed choice about the program most affordable to your family while still meeting your student’s goals.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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Is Community College the Right Place to Start?

Comm-College-the-Right-Place-to-Start

Many students choose to start their college careers at a two-year community college. Is it right for you? Compare your options below.

Two-Year Community College Four-Year College or University
Annual in-state tuition and fees*

Costs are typically lower at two-year colleges.

$3,000–$5,000

• National average: $3,347
• Iowa average: $4,541

$7,000–$32,000

• National average (public four-year): $9,139
• Iowa average (public four-year): $7,857
• National average (private four-year): $31,231
• Iowa average (private four-year): $29,650

Annual room and board*

Many students at two-year colleges choose to live at home and commute.

$0–$8,000

• National average: $7,705
• Midwest average: $6,486

$9,000–$12,000

• National average (public four-year): $9,804
• Midwest average (public four-year): $8,968
• National average (private four-year): $11,188
• Midwest average (private four-year): $9,691

Type of degree

If you plan to transfer from a two-year college to a four-year institution, you should first check how and if specific credits will transfer.

• Associate degrees and certifications for trade-related careers
• Transferrable general education requirements
• Bachelor
• Post-graduate degrees
Hands-on experience • Close association with area industries
• Often offer local apprenticeships and internships
• Can be limited for undergraduate students
• Opportunities for local, national and international internship, cooperative education and study-abroad programs
Campus experience • Traditional to commuter campus
• More limited campus activities
• Traditional
• Extensive campus activities and clubs
Confidence in major or career choice • Little opportunity to explore variety of majors
• Opportunity to achieve a two-year degree, work and then re-evaluate
• More opportunity to explore before declaring a major
• Changing majors and five- or six-year graduation rates are common
Classroom instruction • Career professionals
• Nontenured instructors
• Tenured professors
• Nontenured professors
• Other instructors
• Graduate students
Admission requirements • High school graduate
• Placement test may be required
• ACT or SAT may be required for specific degrees
• High school graduate
• ACT or SAT usually required
• Minimum high school grade point average
• Essay, interview or other requirement may be needed
Schedule flexibility

Do you need to work around a work or family schedule?

• Daytime and evening classes
• Some weekend classes
• Online classes
• Mostly daytime classes
• Some evening and online classes

*2014–2015 Trends in College Pricing, College Board

 By: Iowa Student Loan

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How to Handle Multiple Acceptance Letters

Sometimes the most nerve-wracking part of the entire college admissions process is making the final decision. If you received admission or acceptance offers from more than one of your top choices, these tips can help you choose.

MultipleAcceptLetters_infographicDownload a PDF of this infographic.

  1. Be sure you know how soon you need to make a commitment by comparing dates provided in your admissions packet. (Most colleges and universities give you until May 1 to respond.) If you were admitted and met entrance requirements, you may have some time yet to consider your final choice before you miss the first deadline.
  1. Rank your options. Order your choices based on how well each school fits your needs.
  1. Get student perspectives. If you haven’t already, revisit campus and talk to students. Online resources — like social media, blog entries and comments, and reviews — are also great resources. You can learn a lot of helpful information from those who have been there.
  1. Delve into the nitty-gritty. Look up student retention rates to see if a high proportion of freshmen don’t stay in school; graduation rates for four, five and six years; and job placement rates after graduation. Freshmen do or don’t stay for myriad reasons, but an unusual proportion may indicate an issue you would also face.
  1. Look at your major specifically. How many students are in your major? Do they have trouble getting into the classes they need? Check out the list of required classes for your major and compare that to the number of sections available each semester in the school’s course catalog. Don’t forget to search for online reviews or comments specific to your intended major.
  1. Look at your bottom line. Your total cost to get through all your undergraduate years should be a major consideration. A good financial aid package may move your second or third choice up to the top spot. If a lack of financial aid is keeping you from choosing your favorite school, consider contacting the admissions office to let them know money is preventing you from accepting. If you’re a desirable candidate, they may be able to help with a little more financial aid, depending on their budget.
  1. Commit to one school. You should not agree to attend more than one school. Not only are you likely to lose at least one deposit, a school may rescind its offer if it finds out you are accepting additional offers. The only exception to this is if you are wait-listed at your No. 1 choice; in that case, you may decide to accept your second choice while you wait to hear. Just be sure you notify the second school immediately if you get in at your first choice.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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Plan to Transfer? Tips for a Smooth Transition

The process of transferring from one college to another can be painstaking and time-consuming. These tips can help you transition more easily.

Transfer for the right reasons. You may be in a two-year program looking to complete a four-year degree, you may be looking for a specific program your current school falls short on, you might want to move closer to or further from home, or perhaps you chose a less-desirable college to begin with when you weren’t accepted to your top-choice schools. These can all be good reasons to change. Other problems, like an inability to form a social group, mental or emotional issues, or financial or academic struggles, may or may not be solved by attending a different school. Have a plan for how the transfer will resolve these issues.

Start the process early. The steps detailed below can take time and effort. To increase your chances of success in your new college, give yourself plenty of time to handle the transfer process.

Keep up with your current coursework. This may be difficult depending on your reasons for transferring, but a high GPA and good recommendations from your current professors will increase your chances of being accepted to a new program.

Fill in the blanks. Once you have a list of target schools, research the following to be sure you have the complete picture before applying.

  • Transfer acceptance rate: Generally, the acceptance rate for transfer students is slightly lower than it is for incoming freshman. You can find transfer statistics for a specific school by doing an online search for the college name and “Common Data Set” to see data reported by the college. Don’t forget that competitive or impacted majors may have separate eligibility requirements or acceptance rates at some colleges.
  • Admission requirements: Make sure you meet the minimum number of credit hours, minimum GPA and other eligibility requirements for transfer students. Start on the college’s website. Also, if a target school is one that accepted you as an incoming freshman, contact the school to determine if your previous acceptance still stands or if you need to re-apply.
  • Application process: Some programs will require transfer students to provide letters of recommendation, transcripts from college and maybe high school, or an essay explaining why they want to transfer. If you’re asked to write an essay, remember to provide specific details on how the new program is a better fit for you rather than writing negatively about your current school.
  • Aid available to transfer students: Many schools offer their largest scholarships to incoming freshmen. Research the grants and scholarships available to transfer students from the target school and the department to have a better idea of affordability.
  • Fit for academic and career goals: Make sure the new program is a fit for your goals by looking at graduation and placement rates, course descriptions and syllabi, and career and academic services offered.
  • Credit transfers: Even when transferring from a community college to a four-year program with an admissions or articulation agreement, you may find that not all your credits apply in the same manner at the target school. Be sure you understand how credits will be applied toward graduation and program requirements so you know if you will graduate on time without repeating coursework or outlasting scholarships with a renewal limit.
  • Transfer atmosphere: Find out how transfer-friendly your target schools are by seeing if they offer academic advisers, orientation programs, visits, housing or other programs specifically for transfer students. These offerings can make a difference in your ability to find a new social community and assistance on a new campus.

Know how your financial aid is affected. Besides merit aid available to transfer students, understand how your current financial aid will be affected by a move. Use the Common Data Set and call the financial aid office to find answers to your questions about aid at a new school.

  • Change in federal funds: Some federally funded but campus-based aid, like Federal Work-Study, is never portable. You will lose these awards and may or may not see them matched by your new school, depending on that school’s cost of attendance, financial aid policies and available funds. Federal loan limits may also be affected by transferring from a two-year program to a four-year college. If you transfer mid-term, some federal financial aid funds may be returned to the government.
  • Loss of state and institutional aid: Your current school will no longer provide financial aid awards for attendance at your new college. If you change states, you will not receive funds from the state of your previous college; if you stay in the same state, you may receive fewer state funds based on timing and funding availability.
  • FAFSA updates: Unless you transfer between academic years, you will need to update your current FAFSA with your new school choices. This will result in a new Student Aid Report and financial aid packages from the new schools. If you don’t receive this information within four weeks of resubmitting your FAFSA, contact each school’s financial aid office.
  • Student loan repayment timeline: Contact your student loan lender about your plans to leave one school and re-enroll in another. If you are re-enrolling immediately at least half time, you will likely be eligible for deferment on your student loan payments; otherwise, you may need to start repaying previously disbursed loans within six months.
  • Other financial considerations. If you currently attend school as in-state student but plan to transfer to an out-of-state college, your tuition costs may increase dramatically. In addition, if the transfer of credits or changing programs results in taking longer to graduate, you will incur additional costs before graduation.

Make connections. Once you know which schools you will apply to as a transfer student, start making connections. Contact academic advisers, professors and internship offices to understand how they will assist you in your new program. Visit campuses if possible. Connect with other students, especially other transfer students, through social media.

Get a good start. Once you have finalized your transfer choice, continue to connect with other transfer students at orientation sessions specifically for transfer students. Get involved in activities and talk to classmates in your upper-level courses to meet more people with interests similar to yours. Find an on-campus job to meet people and earn extra money. Get to the career center right away to be sure you’re ready to take on internships and find a job after graduation.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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Choosing a College: Consider Costs

Cost of attendance is often the biggest factor in choosing a college, but the affordability of any particular college or university can be difficult to determine. Here are some steps you can take.

1. Know how much your family can pay for college.

The actual amount you can afford to spend may depend on a variety of factors. Be clear and honest about how much parents are able to contribute and the amount the student will be able to earn or save for college.

2. Understand actual cost of attendance numbers.

Colleges provide current cost information for tuition, fees, housing, meals and other expenses on their websites. Look at these numbers carefully to understand how they are determined. Do tuition and fees change based on number of credit hours? Are students living in residence halls required to pay for a more expensive meal plan? Are the average transportation or living expenses high or low for your situation?

3. Gather information about scholarship programs offered by the college.

The school website is also a source of information about eligibility for the different scholarships offered by the school. Check to see if any apply to your situation and whether they are guaranteed for any eligible student or are competitive awards.

4. Research scholarships, grants and other aid recently awarded to similar students by the schools you’re interested in.

Many colleges and universities offer data about the number of students who received aid and how much total aid was awarded through a document called the Common Data Set. To find it, type the name of the institution and “Common Data Set” in your internet search engine.

5. Estimate your family’s costs.

A net cost calculator can help estimate the amount you may be expected to pay at a particular institution. Search online for the name of the school and “net cost calculator” to find that institution’s tool. Some calculators allow you to input your family’s financial and other information to estimate available scholarships and aid; others are less robust and will provide a more general estimate of net cost. Certain factors, like a family business, may affect the accuracy of net cost calculators.

6. Determine a realistic timeline.

The amount of time it takes the average student to graduate may vary depending on the school, specific program and other factors. The graduation rates provided on the school’s Common Data Set may help you determine a realistic timeline.

7. Compare a reasonable estimate of the actual cost for a total college career to the amount you can afford to pay.

This information will help you decide if a college is affordable to your family. Remember, this is only an estimate, and you may be able to work with the financial aid office, increase earnings, reduce expenses or find additional funding to make a college choice more affordable.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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Applying to College

You’ve been considering colleges for a while now; visit booths at college fairs, perusing websites and pamphlets, and even venturing out on campus visits – all the while looking for that perfect campus that says home away from home.

Well, the time has come to start applying if you haven’t already. October is College Application Month and now is the time to make some decisions about what colleges interest you enough to fill out that application and hit submit.

The application process is actually a lot easier than most people think, but depending on where you decide to apply there can still be some steps to the process.

Step 1:
Narrow your choices. You should apply to 3-5 schools to keep your options open. You want to apply to your top schools, but you also want to make sure your final list includes a safety school. What is a safety school? It’s a school that you know you’ll get into and that has your program of interest. You want to always have a back-up plan and your safety school is your admissions back-up plan.

Step 2:
Review each school on your list and determine their application process and requirements. Are the applications online free? Is there a benefit to applying on campus? What pieces of information are required such as ACT score, GPA, letters of recommendation, or essays? Make a list for each school and then begin compiling everything you need.

Step 3:
Fill out the application. Be thorough and don’t leave anything blank. If you have to submit additional information, be sure you proof read everything and check off each item as you submit it to the school.

If there’s an essay make sure you are following all the instructions. Some schools will provide a prompt or topic they want you to write about. Others may simply ask for a personal statement. Remember that you can reuse certain parts of essays but be sure to tailor each essay to the specific shcool

Once you’re organized, the application process is pretty straight-forward. Just remember to take your time and be yourself on your applications. Try and submit your applications by early to mid-November so you have plenty of time to focus on scholarship applications at each college. And remember, you can also be working on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA.)

That’s about it. Now get out there and submit those applications.

Contributed by: Iowa College Access Network

This is Contributed Content. Any opinions, advice, statements, services, offers, or other information contained in Contributed Content are solely those of the respective author(s) or contributor(s) and do not necessarily state or reflect the opinion of Iowa Student Loan and/or this blog. See the “About” page for additional important information about Contributed Content.

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Registration Opens for College Scholarship Program

Scholarship Gives 30 Iowa High School Seniors Chance at $2,000,
Educates Them on College Borrowing and Personal Finance

Registration is open for a scholarship that offers Iowa high school seniors a chance to receive one of 30 scholarships worth $2,000 for college while learning important financial literacy skills. In addition, each recipient’s high school will receive a corresponding $500 award.

2017 Scholarship recipients with then Iowa Governor Terry Branstad.

High school seniors may register for the Iowa Financial Know-How Challenge: Senior Scholarship at www.IowaStudentLoan.org/SeniorScholarship between now and Feb. 16. Iowa Student Loan® will award $2,000 scholarships to 30 students who complete two online financial literacy tutorials and score highest on a related assessment. Registered students also receive emails highlighting financial literacy tips, such as the importance of early career and college planning and ways to reduce student loan indebtedness.

After registering for the scholarship, students receive emailed instructions for completing the three required online components. The two tutorials — Student Loan Game Plansm and the ROCI Reality Check — were developed by Iowa Student Loan to help students understand the consequences of college borrowing and discover how to maximize their return on college investment, or ROCI.

A related multiple choice assessment will check students’ understanding of the concepts in the tutorials. The 30 high school seniors who score highest on the assessment test will each receive a $2,000 scholarship that will be sent directly to their colleges in fall 2018. If top-scoring students tie, those students will be asked to write and be judged on a short essay so winners can be determined.

Each scholarship recipient’s high school will also receive a corresponding $500 award to be used toward scholarship and financial literacy programs.

“I’m incredibly grateful for Iowa Student Loan and the Financial Know-How Challenge Scholarship. The financial rewards as well as the skills I learned when applying will be a huge help to me … as I strive to pursue my dreams in a way that is financially responsible.”

— Ryan Wagner, a 2017 graduate of Fort Dodge High School and a recipient of the 2016–2017 scholarship

 

The Iowa Financial Know-How Challenge: Senior Scholarship is open to legal U.S. citizens who are residents of Iowa; are seniors at an Iowa high school during the 2017–2018 school year; and attend college in fall 2018. It is a no-purchase-required program, and full rules and details are available at www.IowaStudentLoan.org/SeniorScholarship.

Register Today!

By: Iowa Student Loan

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Addressing Financial Aid Myths

Have you heard that applying for financial aid isn’t worth it because your parents earn too much or because it takes too long to complete? Don’t be tempted by these common myths to skip completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You could be passing up free money. And that’s the last thing you want to do when it comes to paying for college.

FAFSA-Myths-Image

Financial Aid Myth — You won’t receive financial aid because of how much money your parents earn.

Income is not the only determining factor when it comes to whether or not you’re eligible for federal student aid. And there is no income level that automatically disqualifies you for aid. Taking the time to complete the FAFSA is the only way to qualify for federal student aid and you won’t know if you qualify until you do that step, so completing the FAFSA every year you are in school is important.

Also, did you know that the FAFSA is used for more than just federal financial aid? State and school aid is also awarded based on your FAFSA results. If you don’t complete the FAFSA, you could also be missing out on these other sources of financial aid.

Financial Aid Myth — The FAFSA is difficult to complete.

The FAFSA has changed a lot since it was first introduced, and the application is revised often to make the process smoother. The online process uses logic to limit questions to ones that are relevant and completing it online instead of filling out a paper application lessens the chance for mistakes. According to the federal government, completing the FAFSA now takes less than 21 minutes on average. That’s not too bad if the outcome is grants, scholarships and other funds to help lower your college expenses, is it?

Financial Aid Myth — You only need to complete the FAFSA once.

If you complete the FAFSA before starting college, you may think you don’t need to file it ever again. But you should file the FAFSA every year as soon after Oct. 1 as possible if you intend to enroll in classes during the next academic year. This is especially important if your family’s circumstances change because you may be eligible for new or more aid next year. Even if there are no major changes to your family, though, other factors such as how financial need is calculated may mean you are eligible for different options next year. And, once you complete the FAFSA the first time, it will take even less time to complete the following years.

Financial Aid Myth — Your parents are not supporting you financially in college so you don’t have to include their information on the FAFSA.

Unfortunately you may still be considered a dependent student for federal student aid purposes, even if you are paying for all your college expenses yourself. You will need to answer questions in the FAFSA to determine if you are considered a dependent student or an independent student. If you are considered a dependent student, you will need to report your parents’ information on the FAFSA. If you are unsure how what type of student you are, contact your college or university’s financial aid office for assistance.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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