Seven Reasons to Seek Seasonal Employment (Infographic)

7ReasonsSeekSeasonalEmploy-infographic

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As you consider summer employment, you may want to look for seasonal opportunities. Working for an organization that does a large part of its business during a specific time of year can be especially suitable for college students. Here’s why.

1. Work during school breaks.

If you carry a heavy course load or need to dedicate a lot of time to your academics to maintain a specific GPA, it may be difficult to fit in a part-time job during the school year. Seasonal employment, however, is often at its peak during the holidays or the summer, fitting nicely into the slots between academic terms. You may even consider a combination, such as working retail over the winter break and working at a resort in the summer.

2. Work over several years.

Once you’ve worked your first season, and especially if you performed well, you can often count on returning to the same place in future seasons. As a bonus, because you have experience, you may find yourself earning more and taking on more responsibility supervising newer workers.

3. Fill gaps in your regular employment.

If you work on campus or for a local establishment that relies on student or faculty patronage through the school year, seasonal work can provide extra hours and cash when that job slows down.

4. Try on your future career.

Many seasonal jobs can be tied to career goals and provide a good opportunity to experience work in your chosen field. Farm and landscaping work abounds for students interested in agriculture or horticulture. Conservation students may be able to find work at a fishing lodge or forestry station. Education majors are in demand as counselors for summer camps. Resorts often look for summer staff to work with the public.

5. Maximize your available time.

Because certain seasonal and recreational establishments do not need to pay overtime to workers, you may be able to work much more than 40 hours a week. Besides accumulating more cash, you may find that you spend less because of your location or work hours.

6. Live inexpensively.

Depending on the work and location, seasonal employers may provide housing at reduced or no charge for workers. If you normally live on campus or are able to sublet your off-campus housing, this means you can earn money throughout the season without a large housing expense.

7. Find new peers.

The appeal of your seasonal work will draw other students, perhaps from other states or regions, who share your values and goals. This is your chance to develop a network of peers who are interested in the same things you are.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Pay Off Your Student Loans Smarter (and Faster)

Ever feel like you’ll be paying back your student loans for the rest of your life? You’re not alone; more than 57% of people with student loans  are concerned that they may be unable to repay that debt. Student loan debt can feel crushing at times, but there are many manageable ways to chip away at it. With these tips, you can work toward paying off your student loans smarter and faster.

Pay More than Your Minimum Student Loan Payment

One of the most effective ways to pay your student loans off quicker is to pay extra toward those loans each month. Paying the minimum required amount might be enough to keep you in good standing but that means it will still take you the entire repayment term to get out of debt.

Adding a little extra money each month toward your loans can make a big difference, and if you have the income to do this, you’ll save money on interest and time in repayment.

Make Additional Student Loan Payments Throughout the Year

If putting extra money toward your student loans each month isn’t possible, try making a few extra payments throughout the year. This is a great place to start if you’re still trying to figure out just how much you have left over in your budget each month. Set a goal to make an extra payment once every three or six months and see how that impacts your student loan debt.

Don’t Blow Raises and Bonuses

A bonus or raise at work can be thrilling, and it may be tempting to spend that extra money on some “splurge” items. If you receive an unexpected bonus or raise, though, and are not relying on the money for a specific need, you can spend it on your student loans. Doing this can really help to reduce your debt more and, if you put just the bonus or extra take home amount toward your loans, it won’t even impact your budget.

Make Some Extra Money to Put Toward Student Loans

If you feel like you don’t have enough income to contribute extra to your student loan payments, consider a part-time job to help with your budget. The best kind of part-time job is one where you get to do something you enjoy. For some people that means taking up tutoring, babysitting or music lessons. Others prefer to work at a restaurant or get a job at the mall (did somebody say discount?). Find something that works well with your lifestyle and schedule.

Just remember to make a plan to manage that extra income. Come up with a schedule for saving money or putting it directly toward the balance of a loan as you reach a certain amount. It can be very easy to spend money that is designated for loans if it’s just sitting around, so make sure you develop a good system for accountability.

Creative Ways to Make Extra Money

If you don’t want to commit to a part-time job, there are more creative ways to make money. Driving for a ride-sharing company allows you to earn some extra cash on your own schedule, without a set commitment. Or, you may be able to find freelancing work that fit with your skills; try searching the internet for freelancing gigs. Putting on a garage sale or selling higher-value items online or at a consignment shop can help you reduce your belongings while increasing your bank account. These are just a few unique ways to make extra money to pay down your student loan debt faster.

See if Loan Forgiveness Is an Option

Loan forgiveness is not necessarily too good to be true. Not all people are eligible for this benefit, but if you are eligible, loan forgiveness can save you thousands of dollars.

The federal government offers several loan forgiveness programs depending on your career and types of debt. However, there are lots of scams online about student loan forgiveness, so be sure to use a reputable source, like the Federal Student Aid website.

Many states also offer loan forgiveness programs for teachers, nurses and workers in other high-demand but lower paying fields. Be sure to check out what the state you live in offers as far as loan forgiveness programs. Another source is the financial aid office at the college or university you attended as those experts can help you find loan forgiveness or grant programs.

Budget to Save Money in Other Areas

Not sure how people manage to have left over money after bills, loans and fun? You should try budgeting! Budgeting is great because it establishes boundaries for your spending and helps you keep track of where your money is going. This monthly budget calculator can help you get started. When you’re not tracking your spending, you might not even realize just how much you’re spending on certain things.

Once you’re actively managing your spending, you’re more accountable and you’ll likely find you have more money to spend — money that you can put toward paying off loans, saving or investing.

Find Out if Refinancing Can Help You

Refinancing is an option anyone with student loan debt should look into as it’s one of the most effective ways to save money and pay off loans quicker without breaking the budget.

Refinancing your student loans is most worthwhile when you can lower the interest rate you’re paying or combine your loans into a single loan with a shorter term. Both of these cases can help you pay less in interest over the life of the loan.

Iowa Student Loan provides a simple and quick way to find out the rate you would qualify for with our refinance loan and it doesn’t impact your credit score. See if you qualify today.

If you have someone with good credit who is willing to cosign a new loan, you may qualify for an even better rate, saving you even more in interest charges.

Interested in learning more about our refinancing? Check out our beginner’s guide for refinancing.

Get Your Rate

Tips to Chip Away at Debt

Get creative! With a little bit of effort, your student loans will be gone before you know it.

Remember these tips to work toward paying off your student loans faster:

  • Pay more than the required minimum monthly payment amount.
  • Make additional student loan payments when you can.
  • Put any extra earnings or bonuses toward student loans.
  • Look at ways to increase your income or decrease your spending.
  • Consider refinancing your existing student loans.

By: Iowa Student Loan

The Graduation Checklist for Parents

This milestone for your student can mean a lot of work for you. Use this checklist to bring some order to the chaos.

Work with your student to be sure they’ve completed the administrative steps to officially graduate.

  • Remind your student to follow through on these tips for college students and high school graduates.
  • Your student should receive information on how and where to obtain a cap and gown—along with any special stoles, pins, tassels or regalia—for the ceremony.

Consider mementos of the occasion.

  • Your student will have the opportunity to order class rings, yearbooks and other products to mark this important milestone. Check for deadlines.
  • Graduation is also a good opportunity for family and individual photos. Many photographers specialize in senior portraits.

Make any reservations required.

  • If you will be traveling to a college graduation, you may find that hotel rooms and transportation options are booked quickly and up to a year in advance.
  • Graduation party venues may also become scarce depending on location and number of other graduates on your desired date.
  • If you will order baked goods, catering, tents or other services, be sure to start that process early.

Invite friends and family to the party.

  • Work with your student to plan a celebration everyone will enjoy.
  • If guests ask what they can gift to your high school graduate, consider suggesting contributions to a college saving account or a gift card that can be used for textbooks and materials.
  • Don’t forget to have thank-you cards on hand for your student to send shortly after the celebration.

Start planning the move.

  • Whether your college student is moving to a new job or returning home for a while, he or she may need assistance. See our moving checklist for college graduates.
  • As your high school graduate prepares to move to campus, keep a copy of the college’s suggested packing list handy. Also see some items you may want to take care of before fall term begins.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Building Good Credit as a Student

Credit is a tool and, similar to wielding many other types of tools, using credit can have both positive and negative results. Using credit positively can help young adults build a history that may enable them to get better terms for future credit, such as car or home loans.

Federal regulations limit the amount of credit available to teens and young adults. But, it’s difficult to qualify for loans or other consumer credit without a credit history. Here are some tips for students who want to ensure they’re building good credit.

Opt for a student card

Many national credit card companies offer a student credit card for college students, or those soon to be in college. These cards often carry more lenient requirements and low annual fees, and they may offer incentives for certain actions. For example, you may qualify for cash back for achieving certain grades or discounts on purchases.

Don’t go it alone

Work with your parents to become an authorized user on an existing credit account, like a credit card. This means you have a card with your name on it, but the account holder is still responsible for paying the bills. Be sure you understand the card issuer’s policy for reporting credit for authorized users.

Alternatively, look into credit cards that will allow a cosigner. A cosigner would be responsible for any debt if you don’t pay your own bills, so parents or other close relatives are generally the best people to ask. The cosigner must also have good enough credit to qualify on his or her own.

Create a solid work history

A steady record of income from employment indicates that you‘re more likely to repay debt over time. Generally, you need to demonstrate full-time or near-full-time employment to qualify for a credit card or other credit before the age of 21.

Make a deposit

A secured credit card allows you to make a deposit to secure a line of credit. Even if the deposit must be equal to the credit limit, using the card instead of cash and then making regular on-time payments will build credit. Some credit card issuers may offer an unsecured credit card after you demonstrate good use for a period of time.

Take on bill paying

If you share housing with other students, consider holding a lease or utility in your name. This means you will be responsible for collecting your roommates’ share of the bill each month and making the full payment from your checking or savings account. Demonstrating your ability to pay bills on time each month will help build a positive credit history.

Pay early and pay often

Once you qualify for a credit card or other consumer loan, be sure to make payments. Although you may be required to make only a minimum payment, it’s better to pay a credit card balance in full each month to minimize interest. Making more than the interest payment is also a good idea for other types of loans. To help ensure you can make payments, limit your use and carry a low balance.

Check your results

As you build credit, monitor your credit reports and scores for errors and signs of fraud. Each year, you qualify for free credit reports from the three national consumer reporting agencies from www.annualcreditreport.com. (Never pay for a credit report.)

Educate yourself

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) provides resources to learn more about credit reports and scores, building credit and what to do if you suspect fraud or identity theft.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Maximize Your Graduation Money

MaximizeYourGradMoney

Your high school graduation is an occasion to reflect on past accomplishments and prepare for a new adventure in college. It can also be a veritable gold mine.

As college becomes increasingly expensive, many of your family and friends may opt to give you a gift of cash to help you offset your costs. While it might be tempting to use that newfound cash to upgrade your phone or gaming system, you could use that money in ways that will better help you prepare for college. Here are some ideas to make the most of monetary gifts you receive.

If you have: You could:
$50–$100
  • Get a haircut.
  • Have the oil changed in your car.
  • Buy a few dorm or personal care items.
  • Pick up an interview outfit.
  • Buy paper, pens and other supplies.
$100–$500
  • Rent some of your required books.
  • Pay for a campus parking permit.
  • Buy a bike to get around campus.
  • Pay program fees or club dues.
$500–$1,000
  • Get a computer or other electronics you need.
  • Put money toward your tuition bill.
  • Buy plane tickets to come home at the semester break.
  • Save for a rental deposit if you plan to live off campus next year.
  • Pay major- or activity-specific fees.
$1,000–$5,000
  • Save to use toward future tuition and fees.
  • Buy textbooks and supplies for one year.
  • Pay a summer’s rent for an off-campus house or apartment.
  • Cover fraternity or sorority dues and other expenses.
  • Cover insurance deductibles for a car or medical emergency.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Parent PLUS Loan Features, Benefits and Drawbacks: What You Need to Know

The parent PLUS loan is a federal loan that is just one option available to parents looking to cover outstanding costs related to college attendance. Before applying for a parent PLUS loan, carefully consider its features, benefits and drawbacks.

Features of the Parent PLUS Loan

  • Availability: The parent PLUS loan is available to biological and adoptive parents, and in some cases stepparents, of undergraduate students who do not have adverse credit history. Some colleges may include the PLUS Loan in a student’s financial aid; however, just because a PLUS Loan is included does not mean that parents are required to accept it.
  • Limits: A parent can borrow up to the cost of attendance, an amount that is determined by the student’s school, minus other financial assistance received by the student.
  • Interest rate: The parent PLUS loan has a fixed interest rate, which is 7.60% for loans taken out for the 2018–2019 school year. The rate for the 2019–2020 year will be set on July 1, and it may be helpful to note that the rate for new loans has increased each of the last three years.
  • Fees: An additional loan fee is calculated as a percentage of the loan amount (currently 4.248% for disbursements on or before Sept. 30, 2019) and is deducted from each disbursement.
  • Repayment: Borrowers may choose from different plans to repay the loan over a 10-year period. Loans of more than $30,000 are eligible for an extended repayment period that allows borrowers up to 25 years to repay the loan. Repayment generally begins as soon as the loan is disbursed, but parents may request to defer repayment while the student is enrolled at least half time plus an additional six months.

Benefits of the Parent PLUS Loan

  • Pre- and overpayment: Some borrowers choose to make extra payments to pay down parent PLUS loans more quickly and to reduce the amount of interest repaid. There is no penalty for paying extra on PLUS Loans.
  • Federal repayment options: Borrowers may choose from different federal repayment plans to fit their budget, but most income-driven repayment plans are not options for parent PLUS loans. These loans also have deferment and forbearance options for borrowers who have difficulty making payments; however, interest continues to accrue daily even when payments are not required. Unpaid, accumulated interest will be capitalized, or added to the loan balance, at the end of the deferment or forbearance period.
  • Death and disability: The loan can be discharged if the parent borrower dies or becomes totally and permanently disabled. In addition, the loan can be discharged if the student dies.
  • Cancellation: If a parent applies for a PLUS Loan, he or she can cancel all or part of the amount before the loan is disbursed to the school. After disbursement, borrowers have a limited time to cancel all or part of the loan amount by contacting the school’s financial aid office.

Drawbacks of the Parent PLUS Loan

  • Discharge: Federal parent PLUS loans are rarely discharged for financial difficulties resulting from unemployment, age-related or other illnesses and injuries, or bankruptcy.
  • Nontransferable: Parents cannot transfer the PLUS loan to their student to repay after they finish school. Parents and their students may be able to work together to refinance the loan in the student’s name through a private lender; although doing so will result in the loss of federal repayment options.
  • Timing: Many parents face high education debt burdens at a time of life when earning power generally decreases and limited income is needed for living or medical expenses. Defaulting on a parent PLUS loan can lead to the garnishment of Social Security benefits, tax refunds and wages.

Other Considerations Before Taking Out a Parent PLUS Loan

The following items could be considered a drawback or a benefit, depending on personal and other circumstances.

  • Qualification: Approval for a PLUS Loan does not take into consideration a parent’s income, other outstanding debt, assets or years until retirement, so parents should carefully consider how much they can realistically repay.
  • Interest: The fixed interest rate will not increase during the life of the loan, but borrowers also won’t be able to take advantage of lower market rates in the future unless they refinance with a private lender.

Before taking on a parent PLUS loan, you should also compare it to other options, such as our College Family Loan, which is a private education loan with a cosigner option and that features lower rates than the parent PLUS loan as well as no fees.

Interested in the benefits of our College Family Loan? Check out the details here.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Plan for Total College Costs; Enter to Win

Use the free College Funding Forecaster online tool now through April 30 and enter for a chance at one of 10 $1,000 awards.

The College Funding Forecaster helps you get a clearer picture of the total costs, aid and shortfalls over four years using freshman year financial aid award information, as well as family contributions and outside scholarships and grants.

How to Use the College Funding Forecaster

Follow these simple steps to get started:

  1. Gather up your financial aid award information from the college(s) and any information about scholarships received from schools or outside organizations.
  2. Go to IowaStudentLoan.org/Forecaster.
  3. Enter in the college’s financial information as well as information about your family’s earnings and savings and any outside awards.
  4. Review year-by-year estimates and make adjustments for your own situation. For example, living off campus after sophomore year may cost less than living on campus. Or you may be expecting to earn more after the first year of college.
  5. Review the results, as well as the informational tips on how to address funding shortfalls.
  6. Enter your information at the end of the tool to be included in the drawings.

Awards for College

Iowa high school seniors and their parents and guardians can enter the giveaway for a chance at one of 10 $1,000 awards paid to the college on behalf of the winning students.

Use the tool and enter the giveaway today! 

Learn More About the Tool

By: Iowa Student Loan

Seven Tips for Summer Internships

7-Tips-Summer-Internships

Interning during college can help you prepare for the job market as you gain important skills and contacts. These tips will help you get started.

Cast a wide net

This is your opportunity to explore careers and employers, or take on a dream job, before settling down to your permanent career. Consider organizations like the FBI, Disney, MGM, Marvel Comics or the Jane Goodall Institute.

Combine two of your goals

Many college students gain a global perspective through a study abroad program. Similar work abroad programs can help you gain a new perspective on another culture as well as apply your studies in new ways. Start with your campus study abroad office to learn about reputable organizations and needed documentation or other requirements to work in another country.

Know what you want to gain

You can use an internship to define or affirm existing goals, set new ones, earn money or academic credit, meet potential contacts or mentors, gain entry to a coveted employer, or all of the above. Define your goals for your internship so you know which potential employers and workplaces to focus on.

Know what you offer

Internships, especially paid positions, can be competitive. Be prepared to treat the search and acquisition of an internship just like you would a job: prepare a resume and cover letters, interview professionally and sell your skills and enthusiasm.

Ask for help

Besides searching for internships online and through your campus career office, let family and friends, former employers and teachers, and others know you’re looking for certain types of internships. These connections can help pave the way with their acquaintances if needed.

Be flexible and reliable

Some internship providers will have set projects that will help you gain important skills, while others may not know exactly what to do with you. Be prepared to accept projects or tasks others don’t have the time or desire to complete. Use the opportunity to learn more about the inside workings of the organization, make connections and develop suggestions for improvement.

Meet the requirements for credit

You may be able to earn academic credit for an internship. Work with your campus career office or the related academic department to determine if you need to meet certain prerequisites, complete required paperwork or turn in a project or report to earn credit.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Staying on Track for College Graduation

Growing numbers of college students end up staying — and paying — beyond the traditional four years in college. While college can be one of the best times of your life, the cost of extra semesters means you should do your best to stay on track.

Here is what you can do, beginning with your freshman year, to increase your chances of graduating within four years.

1. Know your graduation requirements.

  • Colleges usually have a minimum number of credit hours required for a degree; some majors may require additional hours.
  • Know which classes count toward the degree requirements.
  • Maintain good grades to ensure you meet academic progress standards. If you fall below the minimum, you may be required to take classes that don’t count toward your degree.
  • Understand which electives outside your major you need to complete.

2. Plan out academic courses now through graduation.

  • Your college may offer an online program or paper planner to help you track progress.
  • Some required courses may entail prerequisites you need to ensure you take first.
  • Follow the recommended course plan or curriculum path for your major as a guide.
  • Know which classes are offered every term and which ones are only offered in the fall or the spring.

3. Ask for assistance early and often.

  • Meet with your academic adviser before signing up for classes and any time you need to evaluate progress.
  • Go to your professors’ office hours with questions or discussion ideas.
  • Attend tutoring sessions and meet with classmates to go over work.
  • Visit the campus career center to discuss career paths for your major and plan for resumes and interviews.

4. Focus on your goals.

  • Identify your major as early as possible.
  • Avoid taking classes that provide credit but don’t count for graduation requirements.
  • Attend every class.
  • Stay ahead of your assignments and projects.
  • Check your school email and online portal several times a week.

5. Know how special circumstances affect you.

  • If you are planning to study abroad or take on an internship or co-op, understand how that affects your course plan and timeline.
  • Summer, intersession and online courses can help you gain required credits, but be sure to know how the credits you take outside your college system transfer.
  • You may be able to test out of certain classes. Investigate these opportunities and how those credits are applied.
  • Credits are often “lost” when students transfer to different schools or change majors. Before taking these steps, work with your school to determine how they affect your graduation plan.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Before the Next Big Step: What to Do After Graduation

It may seem like everyone else has it all figured out, and you are undoubtedly tired of the question “What will you do after graduation?” But, if your plans are not yet set as the big ceremony approaches, be assured you are not the first or last to be in this situation.

Whether you’re a new high school grad who isn’t sure about college or you’ve finished a college degree but haven’t been able to land the job you want, here are some suggestions for what to do until you’re able to take the next big step:

Keep Working Toward Your Goals

Don’t let inertia or rejection take over your attitude. Continue working on ways to improve your chances of getting the job you want or being admitted to your desired college.

  • Continue to send out resumes or explore education options.
  • Work on your soft skills, like communication techniques, teamwork, initiative and creative thinking.
  • Review your resume and practice interviews with a professional.
  • Clean up social media accounts.

Volunteer

Opportunities abound to provide service to those who need it. Check out volunteer options that help you expand your horizons and suit your interests. Many volunteer opportunity and matching sites are available online, including:

  • Createthegood.org
  • Dosomething.org
  • Unitedway.org
  • Volunteer.gov
  • Volunteermatch.org

Work

You may have student loans to repay or other expenses, so consider working even if you haven’t found an ideal job. You can:

  • Work one or more part-time jobs that provide skills related to your career choice.
  • Try out a type of career you haven’t previously considered.
  • Provide freelance or consulting services in a field you have knowledge in.
  • Start your own company.
  • Teach something you have a passion for, such as yoga, skiing or beginning coding.

Take a Short-Term Position

Although many opportunities are designed strictly for current college students, you may be able to find paid or unpaid positions.

  • Find an internship related to your degree or in a completely different field you’d like to try out.
  • Apprenticeships may be available to recent college graduates and can offer a good chance to break into a specific job market.
  • Research assistantships are available in both scientific and non-scientific fields.

Travel

This may be your best opportunity to explore the country and the world, before you are committed to a full-time job, settle down with a partner and children, and have social and financial obligations that would prevent it.

  • Work abroad as a nanny, an English teacher or in another capacity.
  • Get a job on a cruise ship or train as an airline attendant.
  • Join a program like Peace Corps, Americorps, GoAbroad or World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms.
  • Become a tourist or adventure guide.

Get a Degree

Even if you’ve already earned a college degree, you may want to continue your education if you have the funds and time.

  • Retrain in a different major or field.
  • Take continuing education classes.
  • Go back to school to get an advanced degree.

Have an Adventure

Like travel, an adventure may be best experienced while you don’t have too many other obligations. Options are limited only by your imagination and come with varying levels of risk and financial commitment.

  • Fix up a house.
  • Audition for a reality show.
  • Take a commercial fishing job.
  • Become a roadie for a band on tour.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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