Getting Back in the Habit (Infographic)

The first few days of a new school year can be a big adjustment after your summer break. Help yourself get back into the school routine by preparing now with these tips.

Download this infographic as a PDF.

Get back into the routine

Start waking up at the time you need to get up to get ready for school or activities. Set your alarm and go through your school morning routine to be sure you’re adjusted. Work on getting to bed at a reasonable time as well.

Notify your employer

If you’ve been working over the summer, now is the time to speak to a manager about adjusting your shift times or to put in your notice. Give your employer plenty of time to rearrange schedules.

Organize your space

Get ready for homework by cleaning your accustomed study area. Make sure you have the space and materials you’ll need to be successful this year.

Gather supplies

Take the time to inventory your school supplies, from paper and notebooks to binder clips and calculators. Replace or purchase as needed.

Clean out your closet

Go through your clothes to see what you no longer need and what’s missing. Take advantage of any sales tax holidays and back-to-school sales to stock up.

Prepare for activities

Get ready for your extracurricular activities for the coming term by cleaning, repairing and replacing equipment as needed. Ensure you have the clothing and other items you’ll need.

Organize your schedule

If you haven’t previously done so, it’s not too late to find a homework and activity organizer that suits you. You may prefer a paper planner, a shared online calendar or an app for your phone or tablet. Whichever you choose, start off right by entering times and commitments you already know.

Prepack

Put all the items you’ll need the first day of school together. Put your supplies and materials in your bag and lay out the clothes you’ll wear. If you’ll take your lunch or other food, have the supplies on hand to reduce last-minute stress.

Make a dry run

If you will be taking a new route to school, driving to school for the first time or starting at a new building, make a practice trip to get the timing down and avoid any pitfalls.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Student Loan Basics: What Parents and Cosigners Need to Know

StudentLoanBasics-ParentsNeedKnow

If a student in your life did not receive enough financial aid to cover the full cost of attendance for college, he or she may turn to you for financial help. If you are considering taking on a federal parent loan or cosigning a private student loan with your student, consider these important points.

1. Student debt is a financial decision.

You are likely emotionally invested in wanting to see your student succeed in college, but it’s important to remember student loans are a financial product and require objective, not emotional, consideration.

2. You are financially liable for the debt.

If you take out a federal Parent PLUS Loan, you are taking on the debt yourself. Carefully consider the repayment terms, interest rate and fees you may face.

If you are considering cosigning a private student loan, be aware that you will be responsible for payments if your student doesn’t make them. Late payments, delinquency and default will affect your credit.

3. The total repayment amount will be more than the loan amount.

Student loans generally accrue interest every day. Interest may also capitalize at certain times, such as when the student graduates or a period of assistance ends. This means accrued, unpaid interest will be added to the principal balance. In addition, you may have origination, late or other loan fees incorporated into the total repayment amount.

4. The responsibility can last as long as the loan term.

Student loans are not typically discharged in the event of bankruptcy or other circumstances. In addition, if your student doesn’t graduate, earn as much as anticipated after graduating or obtain the anticipated career, the debt doesn’t go away. If the loan has been disbursed, cosigners are equally responsible for payment.

Many lenders offer a cosigner release. If you are counting on being released from your obligation to repay the debt, pay careful attention to the requirements for obtaining this benefit. Your student will likely need to make a certain number of on-time payments and meet other conditions before cosigners are eligible for release.

5. Your circumstances may change before the debt is repaid.

If your child or grandchild is entering college now, consider how your income may change before the end of the anticipated loan term. Will you still be working or will you be stretching a retirement income to cover any payments? What happens if you or your student loses a job?

6. You can help your student successfully repay debt.

Preparing your student to fulfill his or her obligations for a cosigned loan or taking on PLUS Loan payments (if that is your and your student’s understanding) is an important step.

  • Research loan options. Consider interest rates, terms and fees, available repayment assistance in the event of hardship, borrower benefits and potential starting salary when thinking about your loan options.
  • Understand potential starting budget. It’s easy for an incoming college student to overestimate how much a starting career will pay and underestimate other expenses when they consider the cost of college and their ability to repay debt after graduation. Together with your student, go through ROCI Reality Check to see starting salaries and job outlook by specific major to gain a realistic view of life after graduation.
  • Monitor college success. Good grades, valuable job and internship experiences and appropriate career preparation can all help your student have an advantage in the job search. You can help your student position him- or herself for a starting salary that will allow manageable loan payments.
  • Make your plan. Experience the parent version of Student Loan Game Plan for tips and information on how to work with your student to ensure success.

By: Iowa Student Loan

How Making Interest Payments Can Save You Big Money Later

If you’re funding part of your college education with student loans, you may occasionally receive statements, even though no payments are due. Ever wonder why?

Those statements are important, and understanding why can save you money in the long run.

They notify you that, even though you don’t have to make payments while you’re in school, interest is adding up on your loans — every single day. If this interest is not paid as it accrues or before your loans enter repayment (usually six months after you leave school), it will be added to your principal balance. If it is added to your principal balance (a process called capitalization), you will then owe more than you originally borrowed. And, the now larger principal balance starts to accrue interest on a daily basis, so you will be paying interest on the accrued interest.

How can you minimize this increase to your loan balance?

If you manage to earn or save some money while you’re in school, you can make monthly payments that pay down the interest as it accrues.

Here’s an example of how making small payments every month could save you more than $1,500 over the full life of student loans.

Note: The information below is an example only. Your payment amounts will depend on the types of loans you receive and the interest rates and the repayment terms on those loans.

Download a PDF of this infographic.

Establishing Financial Habits

Making everyday spending decisions—like whether to order pizza or go to the Caribbean for Spring Break—in college, helps you establish the financial habits you’ll use in the future.

Although eating out every Friday night sounds like a good thing, it may be worth it to give up that treat in exchange for savings of thousands on your future student loan payments.

By: Iowa Student Loan

3 Tips to Limit Borrowing for School

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Before you apply for additional student loans, make sure you’re not borrowing too much. Doing so can make repayment painful. Use the tips below first and then only borrow what you need. *

And if you determine you’ve borrowed too much for this year already, you may be able to cancel part of the loan before all the funds are sent (or “disbursed”) to your college. Check in with your financial aid office to see if you can still cancel part of the loan.

Don’t Borrow for Extras

You should only borrow money that you need to pay college costs, not for incidentals or other items you want.

Check out these big money savers for college students.

Student loans should be used for any education-related expenses such as tuition, room and board, meal plans, book and even transportation costs. Those loan funds shouldn’t be used to decorate your dorm room with the trendiest items when you may already have most of what you need at home. The newest gaming equipment, spring break trips and pizza for all your friends on a Thursday night also shouldn’t be paid for with student loan funds.

Think about it. Do you really want to be paying back that money, plus interest, in 10 years when the pizza is long gone and the décor and gaming items are out of date?

Work a Few Hours a Week

If you want to pick up the latest multiplayer game for a break from studying or want to head to the beach for spring break, think about getting a part-time job during the school year. Working just 10 hours a week can help put some extra cash in your checking account and may help your grades by forcing you to budget your time wisely.

It would probably even be better to use your paycheck to buy needed supplies like books or pay some of the smaller fees charged by your school so that you don’t have to use loans for those expenses. And don’t forget, you can always use any money earned to make monthly interest payments on your current student loans to prevent the loan amount from increasing while you’re in school.

Maximize Your Course Load

Want to do one more thing to keep your loan balance from getting out of control? Be sure you’re taking as many classes as you can so that you graduate on time. Does your college consider 12 hours full-time enrollment but allow you to take up to 18 hours at the same tuition cost? If so, try to make the most of that time. If your grades and schedule allows, consider taking 18 hours at a time. If you can’t manage 18 hours effectively, taking 15 hours can help you stay on track for graduating in four years better than 12 hours will. And graduating in four years instead of five or more can significantly keep your loan costs down.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Crossing the Line: Improve Academic Standing for Financial Aid

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Good grades and test scores typically mean more scholarship opportunities. Did you also know that a small margin can sometimes push you over the line for eligibility, or even for higher awards? Here’s a look at how small improvements matter.

PSAT/NMSQT

The Preliminary SAT (PSAT) is also the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT). If you take the PSAT as a junior, you’re automatically screened for the National Merit Scholarship Program. The top scorers in each state receive special recognition.

  • About two-thirds receive Letters of Commendation and become eligible for special scholarships sponsored by corporations and businesses.
  • About one-third become Semifinalists, and most of those complete several steps to become Finalists. Finalists are eligible for:
    • Merit Scholarships from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, corporations and colleges.
    • Special scholarships up to and beyond full tuition from certain colleges.

The difference between a Commended student’s score and a Semifinalist’s score could be a single point in a metric called the “Selection Index,” which is based on your PSAT scores.

How to Cross the Line

Preparation is key for the PSAT.

  • Take the PSAT 10 as a sophomore to become familiar with the test format and see where your strengths and weaknesses lie to better prepare yourself for the PSAT as a junior.
  • Use practice tests to review the test concepts and learn which answers are considered correct or incorrect and why.
  • Be sure to practice in timed test-taking situations.

ACT and SAT

Most colleges require you to attain a specific minimum score on either the ACT or SAT before admittance. Once you have narrowed down your college choices, review their scholarships pages. Many academic scholarships are based either entirely or partly on those test scores, and one or two more points may push you into a category for a more substantial award.

How to Cross the Line

Many of the same techniques above for the PSAT apply when taking other standardized tests like the SAT and ACT. Keep these additional pointers in mind:

  • While the PSAT and SAT are both offered by College Board and have many similarities, the ACT comes from another provider and the format and content areas may be quite different. Use specific practice tests for the SAT or the ACT, depending on which test you plan to take.
  • Check to see if the colleges you’re applying to require or recommend that you take the optional essay portion.
  • You may retake either the SAT or ACT to try to improve your score.
    • Concentrate on preparing for the areas in which you want to improve, but continue to practice all parts of the test so your other section scores don’t fall.
    • Consider your options for sharing your scores with colleges. You may want to wait to see your new score before you submit it to a college, but an additional fee could be required.
    • If your score improves in some parts of the test, but you have a lower composite score because of lower scores in other sections, see whether your college will superscore, or consider your best score for each section of the test separately.

High School Grades

While you’re checking the test score requirements for scholarships, pay attention to the required high school GPA as well. Will bumping up your overall GPA a fraction of a point move you into another scholarship category and make you eligible for hundreds or thousands of additional dollars?

Increasing your GPA may also make you eligible for increased money from outside scholarship sponsors. When you search for scholarships, try a search with an additional 0.1 or 0.15 added to your actual GPA to see if you get more results. (Don’t lie on scholarship applications; improve your GPA before you apply.)

How to Cross the Line

Increasing your GPA may take some extra effort, but if it nets you additional cash for college, it’s worth the work.

  • Don’t wait. Take steps to improve a specific grade early in the semester or year. Later, you’ll have fewer opportunities to earn points, and a perfect final test can only offset so many earlier mistakes.
  • Take advantage of every extra credit opportunity.
  • Ask your teachers how you can improve your grade. Some may be willing to provide credit for an extra project or paper if you explain why you need the grade boost. (This is most effective if you’re an engaged student who generally completes all work on time, even if you don’t always get an A.)
  • Improve your study habits. See these tips for studying smarter.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Getting Involved: 9 Reasons Why

Opportunities to become involved in extracurricular activities, athletics, and work activities abound. Here are nine reasons high school students should take advantage of at least a few of those opportunities.

1. Discover new possibilities.

Involvement in an activity could spur a lifelong passion, introduce career options and help define identity. For example, many students first find a love for debate or technology through school activities

2. Ease transitions.

Moving from elementary to middle school, or from middle to high school, can be a big change in routine, relationships and environment. Continuing or discovering activities can help make the change go more smoothly.

3. Relieve boredom.

Being involved in an activity often means hours of practice, preparation and, sometimes, travel, which leaves less time for boredom or less-desirable activities.

4. Relieve academic pressure.

As the school work load increases, it may seem counterintuitive to spend more time on other activities, but the outlet is often a needed break from homework and studying.

5. Increase academic performance.

Research indicates that being involved in activities outside the classroom may play a role in improving grades and standardized test scores.

6. Build important skills.

No matter what the future brings, skills like teamwork, cooperation, creative problem-solving, decision-making and leadership will always be important. Many extracurricular activities allow the development of these skills that are transferrable to school, family and future life.

7. Make connections.

Whether it’s a coach, a teammate, a parent or an event judge, involvement in many extracurriculars brings students into contact with others who may become valuable connections later.

8. Improve college applications.

If college is the next step after high school, a record of involvement over several years can demonstrate a continued interest in a particular cause, activity or event. Colleges and universities appreciate seeing applicants who demonstrate that they are successful outside the classroom and will become active members of their academic communities.

9. Find others with similar interests.

A variety of activities are available for students of all backgrounds and circumstances, including:

  • School, club or community sports teams
  • Special interest clubs like card or chess clubs
  • Academic-related activities such as competitive math or science teams
  • Fine arts groups, like newspaper or social media, drama, dance or music
  • Student government
  • Volunteering for nonprofit and service organizations
  • Career-related internships and jobs
  • Other jobs such as retail, babysitting and tutoring

By: Iowa Student Loan

How Working Can Help Your College Student

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The financial, networking and training benefits of working part-time while in college can seem pretty obvious. Students earn cash that can be used to offset loans, pay college costs and fund other expenses. They learn to value money and to budget. They can connect with professionals who may be able to help them locate and succeed in future jobs. They learn how to navigate the workplace, gain skills they can use in their careers and put classroom lessons into practical use.

What may not be so obvious is how working part-time during the academic year can also boost a student’s grades. Although a student’s first job is performing well in school, working for pay a few hours a week may help the student achieve more academically.

The most recent data available from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) demonstrates that the academic performance of students who work 1–19 hours a week was better than all other students’ performance, including those who worked more or less and those who didn’t work at all.

According to 2016 NCES data:
  • The average GPA for all full-time college students is 2.94.
  • Those who worked 10–19 hours per week earned an average GPA of 3.02.
  • Those who worked 1–9 hours per week earned an average GPA of 3.08.
  • Those who did not work earned an average GPA of 2.94.

GPA Per Hours Worked

Estimated Hours Worked Per Week

Average GPA

0–40+ (overall) 2.94
0 2.94
1–9 3.08
10–19 3.02
20–29 2.88
30–39 2.86
40+ 2.95
Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2015–2016 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS: 16)

Why Working Works

The reasons for the grade boost may vary widely by student, job and college, but researchers often conclude that the busier schedule forces students to better manage their available time.

Hanna, a graduate of an Iowa high school attending Kansas State University, agrees. “Having the extra responsibility of a part-time job forces me to study more efficiently,” she said. “I know I won’t have the time to keep procrastinating.”

Another possible reason for the higher average GPA may be that students who work to pay for part of their education expenses are more invested in the outcome. Students who are likely to succeed because of their own goals and motivation may also be more likely to look for and obtain part-time work.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Big Money Savers for College Students

College expenses encompass more than tuition and room and board. Items like transportation, fees, books and supplies, and personal expenses are often rolled into the total cost of attendance, or COA. If you’re looking to reduce your overall cost, and the amount you need to borrow to pay for college, here are some large-ticket items to consider.

Big Money Savers for College Students

Each of the following strategies can save hundreds of dollars each semester.

Books and Supplies

The traditional advice of buying used textbooks instead of new still applies, but you also have other options. Consider the following example for the same textbook with a list price of $257.60.

 

Buy new from university bookstore: $173.40
Buy used from university bookstore: $81.75
Rent new from university bookstore: $164.40
Rent electronic version from university bookstore: $47.57
Buy new online: $110.00
Buy used online $96.00
Rent online: $30.49
Rent electronic version online: $29.99
Use library copy as needed: $0.00

As you weigh your text book options, keep these tips in mind.

  • Think about whether you are likely to want to use the book again after the class is over.
  • Talk to your professor and students who previously took the same class to see how much the text is used. Online reviews and college sites can help you make an informed decision about whether you even need a copy.
  • Ask your professor if an older edition of the same textbook would provide the information needed for the class.
  • Many textbooks now come with access codes or supplements that are not available or not guaranteed in certain formats. These may sometimes be purchased separately.
  • While college libraries generally stock copies of required textbooks, remember that availability may be limited during crucial times.
  • If you decide to rent books, pay careful attention to usage and return guidelines as you may be required to pay full price for books not returned on time.

Lower costs more by purchasing needed supplies in late summer and early fall when discount stores stock up for back-to-school. Compare this list of similar supplies. (Opting for generic items saves even more.)

Item University bookstore Big box retailer
2” ring binder $6.99 $3.55
5 one-subject wirebound notebooks $14.95 $1.25
300 3×5 Index cards $9.00 $1.24
4-pack dry erase markers $8.00 $2.63

Transportation

If you can possibly get by without a car on campus by using public transportation, catching rides home and biking or walking to class, you save in multiple ways.

  • Car insurance. Check with your insurance provider on resident student or occasional driver discounts for college students who don’t have a car on campus and attend college at least 100 miles from home. Discounts can vary but may be as high as 35%. Also consider whether you will be driving while at home over breaks and how that might affect your coverage.
  • Parking fees. The cost of a student parking permit can be well over $100 per year. Add to that the cost of any tickets for parking in unpermitted spaces or exceeding time limits, as well as the cost of metered parking.
  • Fuel and maintenance. Besides the cost of gas, which increases the more you drive, think about the cost of oil changes, tire repairs and other maintenance costs.

Health

Some college and universities charge students a fee for health or dental coverage while they attend school. Carefully review your billing statement or contact your financial services or cashier’s office to see if you’re paying for this insurance. Then, speak with your parents or guardians about any existing coverage to compare cost and benefits.

In addition, cut habits like smoking, vaping or drinking. These products are expensive to purchase and may result in additional costs for doctor visits, fines and more.

Classes

If you took advanced classes in high school or are otherwise academically prepared, check out the testing options. You may be able to test out of or transfer credit for required general education courses, saving you the cost of tuition for those classes.

Also work with your academic adviser to stay on track academically. Repeating classes or taking unnecessary ones costs you money for every credit hour.

In addition, streamlining your coursework can help you leave college earlier, allowing you to save on housing and other costs associated with attending school.

Daily Expenses

Avoiding or reducing daily expenses can also save you upwards of $100 per academic year.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Parents’ Guide to College Prep (Infographic)

Download this infographic as a PDF.

Knowing your student is prepared can help ease your anxiety as they make the move away. Use these tips to help ensure they’re ready for daily life on their own.

Plan for medical emergencies

You are not automatically granted access to your student’s health information or permitted to make medical decisions if he or she is 18 or older and becomes incapacitated, even if you carry the insurance and pay the bills. You may want to have your student properly complete, sign and have notarized official power of attorney and medical information release forms that you can carry on your phone or otherwise easily access in case of emergency. Some colleges have law offices or students available to help undergraduate students with legal needs for reduced or no fees.

In addition, your student should understand when an illness or injury requires self-treatment, a visit to the health center or a specialist, or a trip to the emergency room.

Prepare for other medical events

Check with your student’s college to see if you’re being charged for health insurance and if you can waive it if your plan already covers your child.

You may find your student needs vaccinations or boosters, as well as a regular physical, dental cleaning or vision check before college or soon after arriving on campus. Encourage your student to schedule appointments, complete the appropriate paperwork and fill or refill a prescription for upcoming visits with your help so it’s not all new for later appointments. In addition, provide your child with copies of the pertinent medical, prescription, vision and dental insurance cards.

With your student, put together a basic medical kit for the dorm room with pain reliever, bandages and other health items you normally keep at home.

Set up a financial system

If you will be helping your student financially, ensure you can easily transfer money to him or her, perhaps through a student checking account that also carries your name. Check for financial institutions that have a branch or no-fee ATMs on or near campus.

Adding your student to a credit card account also makes financial transactions simpler. Because a college student’s card could be easily lost or stolen, you may want to set up a new card or account number to avoid problems with your own purchases.

Attend an orientation

Besides actually signing up for an orientation date, your student may need to take online placement tests and training or safety courses before attending. In addition, if he or she will be signing up for classes at orientation, suggest that your student look through the course catalog for entry-level required classes and come up with a preferred and alternate schedule. If your student didn’t attend a summer orientation, look for opportunities with the start of classes.

Get ready for classes

If your student hasn’t yet attended orientation or signed up for classes, suggest that he or she look through the course catalog for entry-level required classes and come up with a preferred and alternate schedule. Besides attending orientation itself, your student may need to take online placement tests and training or safety courses before arriving on campus.

Plan the big move

Decide if it makes sense to purchase items now or wait until you get on campus, depending on planned transportation and availability. Some department store chains allow you to select items at one location or online and pick up at a location close to campus. In general, understand that dorm rooms are small, students will probably only need half or less of their original packing list and they can usually pick up or order items they forgot later.

Make needed reservations

If you plan to attend parents weekend or other upcoming special events with your student, check hotel and transportation availability early. Especially in smaller college communities, nearby rooms and rental vehicles may be booked quickly. If your student will fly home and back to school during high-traffic times like Thanksgiving or Christmas, you may also want to book those flights early.

Get the car college-ready

If your student will be taking a car to campus, help him or her set up any appointments for needed maintenance or repairs over the summer. Discuss an appropriate schedule and possible locations for service they may need close to campus. You might consider a AAA membership with towing services if the student will be driving far, and you may also need to let your car insurance provider know. Finally make sure your student knows what to do in case of a car accident, such as whom to call and what to say to another party.

If your student won’t be taking a car to campus but normally drives under your car insurance policy, contact your provider about possible savings and reduced coverage.

Take care of any additional paperwork

If your student may need an updated passport or their Social Security card or birth certificate, help him or her locate those and discuss how important it is to keep these documents safe. If your child relies on his or her cell phone contact list for phone numbers for you and other important contacts, suggest a printed or electronic list in case the phone is broken, lost or stolen.

If your student will have valuables on campus, consider dorm insurance or check your homeowner’s policy for coverage.

By: Iowa Student Loan

Contacting a Student Loan Servicer (Infographic)

ContactStudentLoanServicer-inforgraphicDownload this infographic as a PDF.

Once you know who your student loan servicer is, you need to know your servicer is there to help you successfully repay your loans at no additional cost. It’s important contact your student loan servicer for any of the reasons listed below.

1. Your contact information has changed.

If you have a new mailing address, phone number or email, or if your name other demographic information has changed, you need to advise your loan servicer. Remember that you are responsible for repaying your student loan debt, even if you don’t receive bills because your servicer does not have your current contact information.

2. You want to make extra or reduced payments.

Your ability to pay may change according to your circumstances. Work with your servicer to make sure extra payments are achieving your goal or that you don’t face unnecessary penalties for reduced payments.

3. You want to apply your payments in a specific way.

If you have several loans with the same servicer, you may want payments to apply more heavily to certain loans within your account, such as those with higher interest rates. Find out your servicer’s policy for payment application across loans and how to direct payments differently.

4. You don’t understand your billing statement or the way previous payments were applied.

If you don’t understand how your payments are being applied to your account, any fees you are charged or have other billing questions, ask your servicer for an explanation as soon as possible. This will help you better understand the most beneficial way to make future payments.

5. You have fallen behind on your payments.

Student loan servicers may report late payments to the national consumer reporting agencies, and nonpayment will eventually lead to default. If you are not able to make your full monthly payment, work with your servicer to determine your options and see if you can avoid negative credit reporting or default.

6. You want to understand borrower benefits.

You may be eligible for benefits, such as a reduced interest rate for making automatic electronic payments. Talk to your servicer about potential benefits as soon as possible to learn how to maintain eligibility.

7. You want to consolidate your student loans.

Your ability to consolidate your loans depends on your servicer and the types of loans you have. You cannot include private student loans in a federal student loan consolidation under federal loan programs, although private lenders may allow you to combine both types of loans in one consolidation. Some private servicers offer consolidation while others don’t. If you’re considering consolidation, work with your servicers to determine your best options. If you are considering consolidating federal loans into a private loan consolidation, be sure you understand what important federal loan benefits you may lose before applying.

8. You want to align your payment dates.

If you have several different loans or more than one servicer, your payment due dates may be different as well. If it’s easier for you to manage a single due date, call your servicers for information.

9. You are close to paying your loans in full.

Because student loans accrue interest every day, your principal balance does not equal a payoff amount. If you want to pay your loans in full, contact your servicer for an accurate payoff amount and date to avoid any surprises.

10. You have any additional questions.

Each borrower’s circumstances are unique, and you may not be able to find accurate, updated information from your specific servicer online. If you have any questions, call your servicer directly. Your servicer is invested in your ability to successfully repay your loan and wants to help you.

By: Iowa Student Loan

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